what ought to be

  • 1 ought — In current use the verb ought is followed by a to infinitive: • You ought to have a cooked breakfast, these cold mornings David Lodge, 1988. Since it is a modal verb, it forms a negative directly with not and forms a question by plain inversion:… …

    Modern English usage

  • 2 ought — 1. verb /ɔːt,ɔt,ɑt/ a) Indicating duty or obligation. There was a certayne lender, which had two detters, the one ought five hondred pence, and the other fifty. b) Indicating advisability or prudence. witnesse Aristippus, who being urged with the …

    Wiktionary

  • 3 ought — [ ɔt ] modal verb *** Ought is usually followed by to and an infinitive: You ought to tell the truth. Sometimes it is used without to or a following infinitive in a formal way: I don t practice as often as I ought. It is also used in an informal… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 4 ought to — W2S1 [ˈo:t tu: US ˈo:t ] modal v [: Old English; Origin: ahte, past tense of agan; OWE] 1.) used to say that someone should do something because it is the best or most sensible thing to do = ↑should ▪ You really ought to quit smoking. ▪ The… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 5 ought — modal verb 1 used to say that someone should do something because it is the best or most sensible thing to do: ought to do sth: I think you ought to make more time for yourself to relax. | What you ought to have done is called the police. | If… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 6 ought — [[t]ɔ͟ːt[/t]] ♦♦♦ (Ought to is a phrasal modal verb. It is used with the base form of a verb. The negative form of ought to is ought not to, which is sometimes shortened to oughtn t to in spoken English.) 1) PHR MODAL You use ought to to mean… …

    English dictionary

  • 7 ought */*/*/ — UK [ɔːt] / US [ɔt] modal verb Summary: Ought is usually followed by to and an infinitive: You ought to tell the truth. Sometimes it is used without to or a following infinitive in a formal way: I don t practise as often as I ought. It is also… …

    English dictionary

  • 8 ought*/*/*/ — [ɔːt] modal verb summary: ■ Ought is usually followed by ‘to and an infinitive: You ought to tell the truth. Sometimes it is followed by ‘to but no following infinitive: I don t spend as much time with them as I ought to. ■ Ought has no tenses,… …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • 9 what's what —  How things ought to be (done) etc.    ♣ I ll show them what s what! wheel v. Bring …

    A concise dictionary of English slang

  • 10 Is–ought problem — David Hume raised the is ought problem in his Treatise of Human Nature The is–ought problem in meta ethics as articulated by Scottish philosopher and historian, David Hume (1711–1776), is that many writers make claims about what ought to be on… …

    Wikipedia

  • 11 Is-ought problem — In meta ethics, the is ought problem was raised by David Hume (Scottish philosopher and historian, 1711 ndash;1776), who noted that many writers make claims about what ought to be on the basis of statements about what is . However, there seems to …

    Wikipedia

  • 12 Sojourner Truth: What Time of Night It Is (1853) — ▪ Primary Source       African American reformer and evangelist Sojourner Truth was involved in the abolitionist and women s rights movements. The following is a brief account of her appearance at and speech before the rowdy Women s Rights… …

    Universalium

  • 13 It is not what a lawyer tells me I may do; but what humanity, reason, and justice tell me I ought to do. — It is not what a lawyer tells me I may do; but what humanity, reason, and justice tell me I ought to do. It is not what a lawyer tells me I may do; but what humanity, reason, and justice tell me I ought to do. Edmund Burke Nolo’s Plain English… …

    Law dictionary

  • 14 should - ought to — Should and ought to are sometimes used with similar meanings. When should has a similar meaning to ought to, you pronounce it in full and you do not write it as d. (See entry at ↑ should would.) …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 15 Oh! What a Lovely War — This article is about the 1969 film. For the original 1963 stage musical, see Oh, What a Lovely War!. Oh! What a Lovely War Theatrical release poster Directed by …

    Wikipedia

  • 16 is-ought problem — noun The problem of whether prescriptive statements stating what the case ought to be can be derived from descriptive statements stating what the case is. See Also: naturalistic fallacy …

    Wiktionary

  • 17 W.E.B. Du Bois: What African Americans Want (1903) — ▪ Primary Source       Although they came to represent divergent perspectives on civil rights, Booker T. Washington (Washington, Booker T) and W.E.B. Du Bois were the two leading African American spokesmen at the turn of the twentieth century.… …

    Universalium

  • 18 Hold come what may — is a phrase popularized by the late Harvard philosophy professor, W. V. Quine. Beliefs that are held come what may are beliefs one is unwilling to give up, regardless of any evidence with which one might be presented. Quine held (on a perhaps… …

    Wikipedia

  • 19 ethics — /eth iks/, n.pl. 1. (used with a sing. or pl. v.) a system of moral principles: the ethics of a culture. 2. the rules of conduct recognized in respect to a particular class of human actions or a particular group, culture, etc.: medical ethics;… …

    Universalium

  • 20 Science of morality — The Good Samaritan by François Léon Sicard. The sculpture is based on a story, and one that would be promoted by science of morality. Nature, habits, culture and norms are all pivotal in this empirical pursuit of harmony among living beings.… …

    Wikipedia