wantonness

  • 1 Wantonness — Wan ton*ness, n. The quality or state of being wanton; negligence of restraint; sportiveness; recklessness; lasciviousness. Gower. [1913 Webster] The tumults threatened to abuse all acts of grace, and turn them into wantonness. Eikon Basilike.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 wantonness — index delinquency (misconduct), vice Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 3 wantonness — is spelt with two ns …

    Modern English usage

  • 4 wantonness — noun a) The state or characteristic of being wanton; recklessness, especially as represented in lascivious or other excessive behavior. The sweetness was turned to adamantine, heartless cruelty, and the purity to voluptuous wantonness. b) A… …

    Wiktionary

  • 5 wantonness — wanton ► ADJECTIVE 1) (of a cruel or violent action) deliberate and unprovoked. 2) sexually immodest or promiscuous. 3) literary growing profusely; luxuriant. ► NOUN archaic ▪ a sexually immodest or promiscuous woman. DERIVATIVES wantonly adverb …

    English terms dictionary

  • 6 wantonness — noun see wanton I …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 7 wantonness — See wantonly. * * * …

    Universalium

  • 8 wantonness — (Roget s Thesaurus II) noun A complete surrender of inhibitions: abandon, abandonment, incontinence, unrestraint, wildness. See RESTRAINT …

    English dictionary for students

  • 9 wantonness — wan·ton·ness || wÉ‘ntÉ™nɪs / wÉ’n n. quality or state of being wanton; recklessness; licentiousness; squandering …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 10 wantonness — n licentiousness, looseness, dissoluteness, dissipation, profligacy, debauchery, rakishness; lechery, lubricity, lust, libidinousness, salaciousness, salacity, promiscuity; abandon, unrestraint, self indulgence, intemperance, incontinence …

    A Note on the Style of the synonym finder

  • 11 wantonness — wan·ton·ness …

    English syllables

  • 12 wantonness — See: wanton …

    English dictionary

  • 13 wantonness — See wanton act; wanton omission …

    Ballentine's law dictionary

  • 14 wantonness — noun 1. the trait of lacking restraint or control; reckless freedom from inhibition or worry she danced with abandon • Syn: ↑abandon, ↑unconstraint • Derivationally related forms: ↑wanton • Hypernyms: ↑unr …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 15 sexual wantonness — recklessness in sexual behavior …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 16 ὑβριστικά — ὑβριστικός given to wantonness neut nom/voc/acc pl ὑβριστικά̱ , ὑβριστικός given to wantonness fem nom/voc/acc dual ὑβριστικά̱ , ὑβριστικός given to wantonness fem nom/voc sg (doric aeolic) …

    Greek morphological index (Ελληνική μορφολογικούς δείκτες)

  • 17 ὑβριστικώτερον — ὑβριστικός given to wantonness adverbial comp ὑβριστικός given to wantonness masc acc comp sg ὑβριστικός given to wantonness neut nom/voc/acc comp sg …

    Greek morphological index (Ελληνική μορφολογικούς δείκτες)

  • 18 wanton — I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from wan deficient, wrong, mis (from Old English, from wan deficient) + towen, past participle of teen to draw, train, discipline, from Old English tēon more at tow Date: 14th century 1. a. archaic hard to… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 19 Theodora (6th century) — Theodora (Greek: Θεοδώρα) (c. 500 June 28 548), was empress of the Byzantine Empire and the wife of Emperor Justinian I. Like her husband, she is a saint in the Orthodox Church, commemorated on November 14. Theodora is perhaps the most… …

    Wikipedia

  • 20 abandon — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) v. t. relinquish, resign, give up, forgo, surrender, discontinue, waive, abdicate; leave, quit, evacuate, withdraw (from); desert, forsake, maroon, discard, drop; let go, throw up, pull out of, have done …

    English dictionary for students