vile wretch

  • 1 Wretch — Wretch, n. [OE. wrecche, AS. wrecca, wr[ae]cca, an exile, a wretch, fr. wrecan to drive out, punish; properly, an exile, one driven out, akin to AS. wr[ae]c an exile, OS. wrekkio a stranger, OHG. reccheo an exile. See {Wreak}, v. t.] [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 wretch — (n.) O.E. wrecca wretch, stranger, exile, from P.Gmc. *wrakjan (Cf. O.S. wrekkio, O.H.G. reckeo a banished person, exile, Ger. recke renowned warrior, hero ), related to O.E. wreccan to drive out, punish (see WREAK (Cf. wreak)). Sense of vile,… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 3 wretch —    This word is now rather old fashioned, but it came easily to speakers in former times who wished to abuse someone. It was in regular use from the fourteenth to the nineteenth century, with the meaning of ‘vile person’, and was either insulting …

    A dictionary of epithets and terms of address

  • 4 wretch — noun Etymology: Middle English wrecche, from Old English wrecca outcast, exile; akin to Old High German hrechjo fugitive, Old English wrecan to drive, drive out more at wreak Date: before 12th century 1. a miserable person ; one who is profoundly …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 5 reprobate — I. a. Depraved, abandoned, profligate, corrupt, hardened, lost, graceless, base, shameless, wicked, vile, vitiated, irredeemable, castaway. II. n. Villain, castaway, outcast, miscreant, caitiff, vile wretch. III. v. a. 1. Disapprove, reject,… …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 6 Miscreant — Mis cre*ant, n. [OF. mescreant, F. m[ e]cr[ e]ant; pref. mes (L. minus less) + p. pr. fr. L. credere to believe. See {Creed}.] [1913 Webster] 1. One who holds a false religious faith; a misbeliever. [Obs.] Spenser. De Quincey. [1913 Webster] Thou …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 niding — noun A derogatory term, a vile wretch, used in Heathenry …

    Wiktionary

  • 8 miscreant — n. Villain, scoundrel, knave, rascal, rogue, scamp, vile wretch, caitiff …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 9 villain — n. [Written also Villan.] Rascal, knave, scoundrel, rogue, scamp, reprobate, scapegrace, miscreant, caitiff, vile wretch …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 10 scoundrel — I. n. Knave, rogue, villain, rascal, scamp, cheat, trickster, swindler, sharper, caitiff, vile wretch, miscreant, reprobate. II. a. Base, mean, unprincipled, disgraceful, low …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 11 miscreant — /ˈmɪskriənt / (say miskreeuhnt) adjective 1. depraved, villainous, or base. 2. Obsolete misbelieving; holding a false religious belief. –noun 3. a vile wretch; villain. 4. Obsolete a misbelieving person, as a heretic or an infidel. {Middle… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 12 miscreant — n. & adj. n. 1 a vile wretch, a villain. 2 archaic a heretic. adj. 1 depraved, villainous. 2 archaic heretical. Etymology: ME f. OF mescreant (as MIS (2), creant part. of croire f. L credere believe) …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 13 Frankenstein — This article is about the novel. For the characters, see Victor Frankenstein or Frankenstein s monster. For other uses, see Frankenstein (disambiguation). Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus …

    Wikipedia

  • 14 De Falsis Deis — De falsis deis, also known as ”Homily XII ” and ”On False Gods””, is one of the homilies written by Wulfstan II, Archbishop of York and was an expansion of part of one of Ælfric of Eynsham’s homilies. Both works also drew on the writing of Martin …

    Wikipedia

  • 15 History of American newspapers — The history of American newspapers goes back to the 17th century with the publication of the first colonial newspapers.Colonial period(This section is based on [http://www.bartleby.com/225/index.html#7 The Cambridge History of English and… …

    Wikipedia

  • 16 ness — ness·ber·ry; ness·ler·iza·tion; ness·ler·ize; ness·ler s; new·fan·gled·ness; new·ness; news·i·ness; nice·ness; nig·gard·li·ness; nig·gard·ness; nigh·ness; nip·pi·ness; no·ble·ness; nois·i·ness; non·cha·lant·ness; north·er·li·ness; north·ness;… …

    English syllables

  • 17 ly — ly·so·genesis; ly·so·genetic; Ly·sol; ly·so·lecithin; ly·so·zyme; ly·syl; ly·thra·ce·ae; ly·thra·les; ly·thrum; mach·i·a·vel·li·an·ly; ma·chine·ly; mac·ro·ceph·a·ly; mad·ly; mag·i·cal·ly; mag·is·te·ri·al·ly; mag·is·tral·ly; mag·net·i·cal·ly;… …

    English syllables

  • 18 Cullion — Cul lion (k?l y?n), n. [OF. couillon, coillon, F. co?on, a vile fellow, coward, dupe, from OF. couillon, coillon, testicle, fr. il the scrotum, fr. L. coleus a leather bag, the scrotum.] A mean wretch; a base fellow; a poltroon; a scullion. Away …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 19 Rakeshame — Rake shame (r[=a]k sh[=a]m ), n. [Cf. {Rakehell}, {Ragabash}.] A vile, dissolute wretch. [Obs.] Milton. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 20 Villainous — Vil lain*ous, a. [Written also villanous.] [1913 Webster] 1. Base; vile; mean; depraved; as, a villainous person or wretch. [1913 Webster] 2. Proceeding from, or showing, extreme depravity; suited to a villain; as, a villainous action. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English