take for

  • 1 take for — {v.} To suppose to be; mistake for. * /Do you take me for a fool?/ * /At first sight you would take him for a football player, not a poet./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 2 take for — {v.} To suppose to be; mistake for. * /Do you take me for a fool?/ * /At first sight you would take him for a football player, not a poet./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 3 take for — phrasal to suppose to be; especially to suppose mistakenly to be …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 4 take for granted — {v. phr.} 1. To suppose or understand to be true. * /Mr. Harper took for granted that the invitation included his wife./ * /A teacher cannot take it for granted that students always do their homework./ Compare: BEG THE QUESTION. 2. To accept or… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 5 take for granted — {v. phr.} 1. To suppose or understand to be true. * /Mr. Harper took for granted that the invitation included his wife./ * /A teacher cannot take it for granted that students always do their homework./ Compare: BEG THE QUESTION. 2. To accept or… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 6 take for a ride — {v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To take out in a car intending to murder. * /The gang leader decided that the informer must be taken for a ride./ 2. To play a trick on; fool. * /The girls told Linda that a movie star was visiting the school, but she did… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 7 take for a ride — {v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To take out in a car intending to murder. * /The gang leader decided that the informer must be taken for a ride./ 2. To play a trick on; fool. * /The girls told Linda that a movie star was visiting the school, but she did… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 8 take for a ride — phrasal trick, cheat …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 9 take for granted — phrasal 1. to assume as true, real, or expected 2. to value too lightly …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 10 Take — Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands, or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 11 for a ride — See: TAKE FOR A RIDE …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 12 for a ride — See: TAKE FOR A RIDE …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 13 for granted — See: TAKE FOR GRANTED …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 14 for granted — See: TAKE FOR GRANTED …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 15 Take Ionescu — Prime Minister of Romania In office December 18, 1921 – January 19, 1922 Monarch Ferdinand I of Romania Preceded by …

    Wikipedia

  • 16 Take Me Out to the Ball Game — is an early 20th century Tin Pan Alley song which became the unofficial anthem of baseball although neither of its authors had attended a game prior to writing the song.cite web | url=http://lcweb2.loc.gov/diglib/ihas/loc.natlib.ihas.200153239/def… …

    Wikipedia

  • 17 Take Off Your Pants and Jacket — Studio album by Blink 182 Released …

    Wikipedia

  • 18 Take — For other uses, see The Take (disambiguation). A take is a single continuous recorded performance. The term is used in film and music to denote and track the stages of production. Contents 1 Film 1.1 Multiple takes 2 Other 3 …

    Wikipedia

  • 19 Take Me Home, Country Roads — Single by John Denver from the album Poems, Prayers and Promises Release …

    Wikipedia

  • 20 Take It From Here — (often referred to as TIFH , pronounced mdash; and sometimes humorously spelt mdash; TIFE ) was a British radio comedy programme broadcast by the BBC between 1948 and 1960. It was written by Frank Muir and Denis Norden, and starred Jimmy Edwards …

    Wikipedia