swerve

  • 1 Swerve — Swerve, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Swerved}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Swerving}.] [OE. swerven, AS. sweorfan to wipe off, to file, to polish; akin to OFries. swerva to creep, D. zwerven to swerve, to rope, OS. swerban to wipe off, MHG. swerben to be whirled,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 swerve — [swə:v US swə:rv] v [: Old English; Origin: sweorfan [i] to wipe, put away ] 1.) to make a sudden sideways movement while moving forwards, usually in order to avoid hitting something swerve violently/sharply ▪ The car swerved sharply to avoid the …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 3 swerve — swerve, veer, deviate, depart, digress, diverge mean to turn aside from a straight line or a defined course. Swerve may refer to a turning aside, usually somewhat abruptly, by a person or material thing {at that point the road swerves to the… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 4 swerve — [ swɜrv ] verb intransitive or transitive if something such as a vehicle swerves, or you swerve it, it changes direction suddenly in order to avoid someone or something: He swerved suddenly, narrowly missing a cyclist. ╾ swerve noun count …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 5 Swerve — Swerve, v. t. To turn aside. Gauden. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 swerve — swerve·less; swerve; …

    English syllables

  • 7 swerve — index depart, detour, deviate, deviation, digress, digression, divert, indirection (indirect action), oscillate …

    Law dictionary

  • 8 swerve — [v] turn aside, often to avoid collision bend, deflect, depart, depart from, deviate, dip, diverge, err, get off course, go off course, incline, lurch, move, sheer, sheer off, shift, sideslip, sidestep, skew, skid, slue, stray, swing, tack, train …

    New thesaurus

  • 9 swerve — ► VERB ▪ abruptly diverge from a straight course. ► NOUN ▪ an abrupt change of course. ORIGIN Old English, «leave, turn aside» …

    English terms dictionary

  • 10 swerve — [swʉrv] vi., vt. swerved, swerving [ME swerven < OE sweorfan, to file away, scour < IE base * swerbh , to turn, wipe, sweep > Gr syrphetos, sweepings, litter] to turn aside or cause to turn aside sharply or suddenly from a straight line …

    English World dictionary

  • 11 swerve — v. (D; intr.) to swerve from; to (to swerve from a course; to swerve to the right) * * * [swɜːv] to (to swerve from a course; to swerve to the right) (D; intr.) to swerve from …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 12 swerve — 01. They almost hit a dog while driving home this afternoon, but were able to [swerve] out of the way at the last minute. 02. The driver [swerved] to avoid hitting a child that ran out after her ball. 03. The car [swerved] to avoid a collision.… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 13 swerve — UK [swɜː(r)v] / US [swɜrv] verb [intransitive/transitive] Word forms swerve : present tense I/you/we/they swerve he/she/it swerves present participle swerving past tense swerved past participle swerved if something such as a vehicle swerves, or… …

    English dictionary

  • 14 swerve — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun ADJECTIVE ▪ sudden ▪ The car made a sudden swerve to the left. VERB + SWERVE ▪ make {{Roman}}II.{{/Roman}} verb ADVERB …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 15 swerve — {{11}}swerve (n.) 1741, from SWERVE (Cf. swerve) (v.). {{12}}swerve (v.) early 13c., to depart, make off; early 14c., to turn aside, deviate from a straight course, probably from O.E. sweorfan to rub, scour, file (but sense development is… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 16 swerve — verb (swerved; swerving) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English sweorfan to wipe, file away; akin to Old High German swerban to wipe off, Welsh chwerfu to whirl Date: 14th century intransitive verb to turn aside abruptly from a straight line …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 17 Swerve — OtherusesSwerve, by the Coca Cola Company, was a flavored and vitamin fortified dairy drink introduced in 2003. It contained 51% skim milk, was sweetened by a blend of sugar and sucralose, and provided 30% of the Recommended Daily Allowance of… …

    Wikipedia

  • 18 swerve — [[t]swɜ͟ː(r)v[/t]] swerves, swerving, swerved V ERG If a vehicle or other moving thing swerves, it suddenly changes direction, often in order to avoid hitting something. Drivers coming in the opposite direction swerved to avoid the bodies... [V… …

    English dictionary

  • 19 swerve — verb (I) 1 to make a sudden sideways movement while moving forwards, especially in order to avoid hitting something: Jo swerved to avoid a dog. (+ across/off etc): The car swerved across the road and crashed into a wall. 2 (usually in negatives)… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 20 swerve — /swerrv/, v., swerved, swerving, n. v.i. 1. to turn aside abruptly in movement or direction; deviate suddenly from the straight or direct course. v.t. 2. to cause to turn aside: Nothing could swerve him. n. 3. an act of swerving; turning aside.… …

    Universalium