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specious argument

  • 1 specious argument — index non sequitur Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 specious argument — noun an argument that appears good at first view but is really fallacious • Hypernyms: ↑argument, ↑statement • Hyponyms: ↑vicious circle, ↑straw man, ↑strawman, ↑special pleading …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 3 Specious — Spe cious, a. [L. speciosusgood looking, beautiful, specious, fr. species look, show, appearance; cf. F. sp[ e]coeux. See {Species}.] 1. Presenting a pleasing appearance; pleasing in form or look; showy. [1913 Webster] Some [serpents] specious… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 specious — specious, spurious Specious, like the Latin word speciosus from which it is derived, began its life meaning ‘having a fine outward appearance’ (from Latin species ‘outward form’), but in the 17c acquired the unfavourable connotations that now… …

    Modern English usage

  • 5 specious — I adjective affected, apparent, appearing, artificial, assumed, believable, bogus, casuistic, casuistical, colorable, colored, convincing, counterfeit, credible, deceiving, deceptive, deluding, delusive, delusory, erroneous, exterior, external,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 6 specious — spe|cious [ˈspi:ʃəs] adj formal [Date: 1300 1400; : Latin; Origin: speciosus beautiful, easily believed , from species; SPECIES] seeming to be true or correct, but actually false ▪ a specious argument …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 7 specious — spe|cious [ spiʃəs ] adjective seeming to be true but in fact wrong: a specious argument …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 8 specious — adjective formal seeming to be true or correct, but actually false: a specious argument speciously adverb speciousness noun (U) …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 9 specious — UK [ˈspiːʃəs] / US [ˈspɪʃəs] adjective seeming to be true but in fact wrong a specious argument …

    English dictionary

  • 10 specious — adj. 1 superficially plausible but actually wrong (a specious argument). 2 misleadingly attractive in appearance. Derivatives: speciosity n. speciously adv. speciousness n. Etymology: ME, = beautiful, f. L speciosus (as SPECIES) …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 11 argument — noun 1 discussion ADJECTIVE ▪ bitter, heated, violent ▪ big ▪ I had a big argument with my mother this morning. ▪ little, petty …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 12 specious — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) adj. plausible, ostensible, apparent, casuistic, insincere; deceptive. See falsehood, imagination.Ant., logical, sincere. II (Roget s IV) modif. Syn. plausible, credible, colorable, beguiling, deceptive …

    English dictionary for students

  • 13 specious — adj. Specious is used with these nouns: ↑argument, ↑reasoning …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 14 An Argument Against Abolishing Christianity — An Argument to Prove that the Abolishing of Christianity in England May, as Things Now Stand Today, be Attended with Some Inconveniences, and Perhaps not Produce Those Many Good Effects Proposed Thereby , commonly referred to as An Argument… …

    Wikipedia

  • 15 Speciousness — Specious Spe cious, a. [L. speciosusgood looking, beautiful, specious, fr. species look, show, appearance; cf. F. sp[ e]coeux. See {Species}.] 1. Presenting a pleasing appearance; pleasing in form or look; showy. [1913 Webster] Some [serpents]… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 16 Spexiously — Specious Spe cious, a. [L. speciosusgood looking, beautiful, specious, fr. species look, show, appearance; cf. F. sp[ e]coeux. See {Species}.] 1. Presenting a pleasing appearance; pleasing in form or look; showy. [1913 Webster] Some [serpents]… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 17 spurious — specious, spurious Specious, like the Latin word speciosus from which it is derived, began its life meaning ‘having a fine outward appearance’ (from Latin species ‘outward form’), but in the 17c acquired the unfavourable connotations that now… …

    Modern English usage

  • 18 plausible — plausibility, plausibleness, n. plausibly, adv. /plaw zeuh beuhl/, adj. 1. having an appearance of truth or reason; seemingly worthy of approval or acceptance; credible; believable: a plausible excuse; a plausible plot. 2. well spoken and… …

    Universalium

  • 19 non sequitur — I noun anacoluthon, bad logic, circular reasoning, contradiction of terms, disconnectedness, discontinuity, fallacious argument, fallacious reasoning, fallacy, false reasoning, flaw in the argument, illogical conclusion, illogical deduction,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 20 Origins of the American Civil War — For events following South Carolina s declaration of secession from the Union, see Battle of Fort Sumter and American Civil War. The Battle of Fort Sumter was the first stage in a conflict that had been brewing for decades. The main explanation… …

    Wikipedia