sedate

  • 1 Sedate — Se*date , a. [L. sedatus, p. p. of sedare, sedatum, to allay, calm, causative of sedere to sit. See {Sit}.] Undisturbed by passion or caprice; calm; tranquil; serene; not passionate or giddy; composed; staid; as, a sedate soul, mind, or temper.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 sedate — Ⅰ. sedate [1] ► ADJECTIVE 1) calm and unhurried. 2) staid and rather dull. DERIVATIVES sedately adverb sedateness noun. ORIGIN originally used also as a medical term in the sense «not sore or painful»: from Latin sedare settle …

    English terms dictionary

  • 3 sedate — index peaceable, phlegmatic, solemn Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 4 sedate — grave, staid, earnest, sober, *serious, solemn, somber Analogous words: placid, *calm, serene,.tranquil: collected, composed, imperturbable (see COOL): *decorous, seemly, proper Antonyms: flighty …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 5 sedate — [adj] calm, collected cold sober*, composed, cool, cool as cucumber*, decorous, deliberate, demure, dignified, dispassionate, earnest, grave, imperturbable, laid back*, no nonsense, placid, proper, quiet, seemly, serene, serious, sober, solemn,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 6 sedate — sedate1 [si dāt′] adj. [L sedatus, pp. of sedare, to settle, caus. of sedere, to SIT] calm, quiet, or composed; esp., serious and unemotional; staid; decorous SYN. SERIOUS sedately adv. sedateness n. ☆ sedate2 [si dāt′ ] vt. sedated, sedating …

    English World dictionary

  • 7 sedate — [[t]sɪde͟ɪt[/t]] sedates, sedating, sedated 1) ADJ GRADED: usu ADJ n If you describe someone or something as sedate, you mean that they are quiet and rather dignified, though perhaps a bit dull. She took them to visit her sedate, elderly cousins …

    English dictionary

  • 8 sedate — se|date1 [sıˈdeıt] adj [Date: 1600 1700; : Latin; Origin: , past participle of sedare to make calm ] 1.) calm, serious, and formal ▪ a sedate seaside town ▪ The wedding was rather a sedate occasion. 2.) formal moving slowly and calmly ▪ We… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 9 sedate — I UK [sɪˈdeɪt] / US adjective quiet or slow, and not likely to shock people or attract attention a sedate neighbourhood They continued at a more sedate pace. Derived word: sedately adverb II UK [sɪˈdeɪt] / US verb [transitive] Word forms sedate …

    English dictionary

  • 10 sedate — se|date1 [ sı deıt ] adjective quiet or slow, and not likely to shock people or attract attention: a sedate neighborhood They continued at a more sedate pace. ╾ se|date|ly adverb sedate se|date 2 [ sı deıt ] verb transitive to give someone a… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 11 sedate — sedately, adv. sedateness, n. /si dayt /, adj., v., sedated, sedating. adj. 1. calm, quiet, or composed; undisturbed by passion or excitement: a sedate party; a sedate horse. v.t. 2. to put (a person) under sedation. [1640 50; < L sedatus (ptp.… …

    Universalium

  • 12 sedate — {{11}}sedate (adj.) 1660s, from L. sedatus composed, moderate, quiet, tranquil, pp. of sedare to settle, calm, causative of sedere to sit (see SEDENTARY (Cf. sedentary)). {{12}}sedate (v.) treat with sedatives, 1945, a back formation from the… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 13 sedate — 1 adjective 1 moving in a slow and rather formal way: a sedate procession 2 peaceful, ordinary, and not very exciting: a sedate seaside town on the South Coast sedately adverb sedateness noun (U) 2 verb (transitive often passive) to make someone… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 14 sedate — I verb the patient had to be sedated Syn: tranquilize, put under sedation, drug II adjective 1) a sedate pace Syn: slow, steady, dignified, unhurried, relaxed, measured, leisurely, slow moving, easy …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 15 sedate — adj. Sedate is used with these nouns: ↑walk …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 16 sedate — [sɪˈdeɪt] adj I quiet or slow, and not likely to shock people or attract attention sedately adv II verb [T] sedate [sɪˈdeɪt] to give someone a SEDATIVE …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • 17 sedate — I. adjective Etymology: Latin sedatus, from past participle of sedare to calm; akin to sedēre to sit more at sit Date: 1663 keeping a quiet steady attitude or pace ; unruffled Synonyms: see serious • sedately adverb • sedateness …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 18 sedate — 1. adjective in a composed and temperate state. 2. verb to tranquilize by giving a sedative; to calm; to soothe; to …

    Wiktionary

  • 19 sedate — To bring under the influence of a sedative. [L. sedatus; see sedation] * * * se·date si dāt vt, se·dat·ed; se·dat·ing to dose with sedatives <the patient was sedated before the procedure> …

    Medical dictionary

  • 20 sedate — Synonyms and related words: anesthetize, aristocratic, august, calm, collected, composed, controlled, conventional, cool, courtly, decorous, demure, detached, dignified, dispassionate, dope, drug, earnest, entrance, even tempered, formal,… …

    Moby Thesaurus