retain

  • 1 RETAIN — is a mainframe based database system, accessed via IBM 3270 terminals (or more likely, emulators), used internally within IBM providing service support to IBM field personnel and customers.The acronym RETAIN stands for REmote Technical Assistance …

    Wikipedia

  • 2 retain — re‧tain [rɪˈteɪn] verb [transitive] 1. to keep something or to continue to have it: • A duplicate copy of the invoice will be retained for record purposes. • Following the merger, the family will retain a 1.9% stake in the company. 2 …

    Financial and business terms

  • 3 Retain — Re*tain (r[ e]*t[=a]n ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Retained} (r[ e]*t[=a]nd ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Retaining}.] [F. retainir, L. retinere; pref. re re + tenere to hold, keep. See {Tenable}, and cf. {Rein} of a bridle, {Retention}, {Retinue}.] 1. To… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 retain — re·tain /ri tān/ vt 1: to keep in possession or use 2: to keep in one s pay or service; specif: to employ (as a lawyer) by paying a retainer Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …

    Law dictionary

  • 5 retain — [v1] hold on to physically or mentally absorb, bear in mind, cling to, clutch, contain, detain, enjoy, grasp, hand onto, have, hold, hold fast, husband, keep, keep in mind, keep possession, maintain, memorize, mind, own, possess, preserve, put… …

    New thesaurus

  • 6 retain — [ri tān′] vt. [ME reteynen < OFr retenir < LL * retenere, for L retinere < re , back + tenere, to hold: see THIN] 1. to hold or keep in possession 2. to keep in a fixed state or condition 3. to continue to have or hold in [to retain… …

    English World dictionary

  • 7 Retain — Re*tain , v. i. 1. To belong; to pertain. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] A somewhat languid relish, retaining to bitterness. Boyle. [1913 Webster] 2. To keep; to continue; to remain. [Obs.] Donne. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8 retain — (v.) late 14c., from O.Fr. retenir, from L. retinere hold back, from re back (see RE (Cf. re )) + tenere to hold (see TENET (Cf. tenet)). Meaning keep (another) attached to one s person, keep in service is from mid 15c.; specifically of lawyers… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 9 retain — *keep, keep back, keep out, detain, withhold, reserve, hold, hold back Analogous words: *have, hold, own, possess, enjoy: *save, preserve, conserve Contrasted words: *discard, shed, cast: *relinquish, surrender, abandon, yield: * …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 10 retain — ► VERB 1) continue to have; keep possession of. 2) absorb and continue to hold (a substance). 3) keep in place; hold fixed. 4) keep engaged in one s service. 5) secure the services of (a barrister) with a preliminary payment. DERIVATIVES… …

    English terms dictionary

  • 11 retain — 01. It can be difficult to [retain] a lot of new vocabulary. 02. The [retention] of information is aided by repetition. 03. With our new thermos, your coffee will [retain] its temperature 25% longer than in a standard thermos. 04. Maria has… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 12 retain */*/ — UK [rɪˈteɪn] / US verb [transitive] Word forms retain : present tense I/you/we/they retain he/she/it retains present participle retaining past tense retained past participle retained formal 1) to keep someone or something These plans encourage… …

    English dictionary

  • 13 retain — re|tain W2S2 [rıˈteın] v [T] formal [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: retenir, from Latin retinere, from tenere to hold ] 1.) to keep something or continue to have something ▪ You have the right to retain possession of the goods. ▪ The… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 14 retain — verb ADVERB ▪ nonetheless, still, yet ▪ no longer ▪ somehow ▪ Despite the decay the mosque somehow retained a profound grandeur. ▪ …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 15 retain — re|tain [ rı teın ] verb transitive FORMAL ** 1. ) to keep someone or something: These programs encourage the elderly to retain their independence. We re trying to recruit and retain skilled staff. The U.S. expects to retain control over the… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 16 retain — [[t]rɪte͟ɪn[/t]] ♦♦♦ retains, retaining, retained 1) VERB To retain something means to continue to have that thing. [FORMAL] [V n] The interior of the shop still retains a nineteenth century atmosphere... [V n] He retains a deep respect for the… …

    English dictionary

  • 17 retain — retainable, adj. retainability, retainableness, n. retainment, n. /ri tayn /, v.t. 1. to keep possession of. 2. to continue to use, practice, etc.: to retain an old custom. 3. to continue to hold or have: to retain a prisoner in custody; a cloth… …

    Universalium

  • 18 retain — /rI teIn/ verb (T) formal 1 to keep something or continue to have something: A copy of the invoice should be retained by the Accounts Department. | It s important that the elderly should retain a sense of dignity. | a heavy soil that retains… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 19 retain — verb 1) the government retained a share in the industries Syn: keep, keep possession of, keep hold of, hold on to, hang on to Ant: give up 2) existing footpaths are to be retained Syn: maintain …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 20 retain — /rɪ teɪn/ verb 1. to keep something or someone ● measures to retain experienced staff ● Out of the profits, the company has retained £50,000 as provision against bad debts. 2. ♦ to retain a lawyer to act for a company to agree with a lawyer that… …

    Dictionary of banking and finance