relieve from wrong

  • 1 relieve — re|lieve S3 [rıˈli:v] v [T] ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(pain)¦ 2¦(problem)¦ 3¦(replace somebody)¦ 4 relieve yourself 5¦(boring)¦ 6¦(war)¦ Phrasal verbs  relieve somebody of something ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 2 relieve — verb (relieved; relieving) Etymology: Middle English releven, from Anglo French relever to raise, relieve, from Latin relevare, from re + levare to raise more at lever Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. to free from a burden ; give aid or… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 3 Relieve — Re*lieve (r? l?v ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Relieved} ( l?vd ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Relieving}.] [OE. releven, F. relever to raise again, discharge, relieve, fr. L. relevare to lift up, raise, make light, relieve; pref. re re + levare to raise, fr.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 relieve — re‧lieve [rɪˈliːv] verb [transitive] to make a bad situation less severe: • Its Japanese parent company is expected to inject capital to relieve its crushing $3 billion debt. relieve somebody of something phrasal verb [transitive] 1. to help… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 5 relieve — re|lieve [ rı liv ] verb transitive ** 1. ) to make pain or another bad physical feeling less unpleasant: Use a cooling gel to relieve the discomfort of sunburn. Your headaches can easily be relieved by regular aspirin. 2. ) to replace someone… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 6 relieve of — phrasal verb [transitive] Word forms relieve of : present tense I/you/we/they relieve of he/she/it relieves of present participle relieving of past tense relieved of past participle relieved of 1) relieve someone of something formal to take a… …

    English dictionary

  • 7 relieve — relievable, adj. relievedly /ri lee vid lee/, adv. /ri leev /, v., relieved, relieving. v.t. 1. to ease or alleviate (pain, distress, anxiety, need, etc.). 2. to free from anxiety, fear, pain, etc. 3. to fr …

    Universalium

  • 8 relieve — re•lieve [[t]rɪˈliv[/t]] v. lieved, liev•ing 1) to ease or alleviate (pain, distress, anxiety, need, etc.); mitigate; allay 2) to free from anxiety, fear, pain, etc 3) to free from need or poverty 4) to bring effective aid to (a besieged town,… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 9 relieve — /rəˈliv / (say ruh leev) verb (t) (relieved, relieving) 1. to ease or alleviate (pain, distress, anxiety, need, etc.). 2. to free from anxiety, fear, pain, etc. 3. to deliver from poverty, need, etc. 4. to bring efficient aid to (a besieged town …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 10 List of characters from Total Drama Island — This is a list of characters in the Canadian animated television series Total Drama Island and its second season, Total Drama Action . The characters consist of the cast members, the two teams of contestants (the Screaming Gophers and the Killer… …

    Wikipedia

  • 11 Right — Right, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Righted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Righting}.] [AS. rihtan. See {Right}, a.] 1. To bring or restore to the proper or natural position; to set upright; to make right or straight (that which has been wrong or crooked); to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 12 Righted — Right Right, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Righted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Righting}.] [AS. rihtan. See {Right}, a.] 1. To bring or restore to the proper or natural position; to set upright; to make right or straight (that which has been wrong or crooked); to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 13 Righting — Right Right, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Righted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Righting}.] [AS. rihtan. See {Right}, a.] 1. To bring or restore to the proper or natural position; to set upright; to make right or straight (that which has been wrong or crooked); to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 14 To right a vessel — Right Right, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Righted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Righting}.] [AS. rihtan. See {Right}, a.] 1. To bring or restore to the proper or natural position; to set upright; to make right or straight (that which has been wrong or crooked); to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 15 To right the helm — Right Right, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Righted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Righting}.] [AS. rihtan. See {Right}, a.] 1. To bring or restore to the proper or natural position; to set upright; to make right or straight (that which has been wrong or crooked); to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 16 right — I. a. 1. Straight, direct, rectilinear, not crooked. 2. Upright, erect, not oblique, perpendicular. 3. Just, lawful, equitable, fair, rightful, honest, in accordance with duty, unswerving, upright. 4. Fit, suitable, seemly, proper, becoming,… …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 17 British moralists of the eighteenth century: Shaftesbury, Butler and Price — David McNaughton In this chapter I discuss the moral theories of three influential writers: Anthony Ashley Cooper, Third Earl of Shaftesbury (1671–1713); Joseph Butler (1692–1752) and Richard Price (1723–91). All three wrote extensively on issues …

    History of philosophy

  • 18 Insanity defense — For similar defences in Canada and Australia, see mental disorder defence …

    Wikipedia

  • 19 Whewell’s philosophy of science and ethics — Struan Jacobs ON SCIENCE Introduction Among the most prodigious of English minds of the nineteenth century, William Whewell (1794–1866) was at various times, and among other things, philosopher, intellectual historian, scientist, educationist,… …

    History of philosophy

  • 20 redress — redressable, redressible, adj. redresser, redressor, n. n. /ree dres, ri dres /; v. /ri dres /, n. 1. the setting right of what is wrong: redress of abuses. 2. relief from wrong or injury. 3. compensation or satisfaction for a wrong or injury.… …

    Universalium