rebuke

  • 1 Rebuke — Re*buke (r[ e]*b[=u]k ), n. 1. A direct and pointed reproof; a reprimand; also, chastisement; punishment. [1913 Webster] For thy sake I have suffered rebuke. Jer. xv. 15. [1913 Webster] Why bear you these rebukes and answer not? Shak. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 Rebuke — Re*buke (r[ e]*b[=u]k ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Rebuked} (r[ e]*b[=u]kt ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Rebuking}.] [OF. rebouquier to dull, blunt, F. reboucher; perhaps fr. pref. re re + bouche mouth, OF. also bouque, L. bucca cheek; if so, the original sense …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 rebuke — [n] reprimand; harsh criticism admonishment, admonition, affliction, bawling out*, berating, blame, castigation, censure, chewingout*, chiding, comeuppance, condemnation, correction, disapproval, dressing down*, earful*, expostulation, going… …

    New thesaurus

  • 4 rebuke — I verb accuse, admonish, animadvert on, berate, blame, bring to book, call down, call to account, call to task, castigate, censure, charge, chastise, chide, correct, criminate, criticize, disapprove, exprobrate, find fault with, judge, lecture,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 5 rebuke — *reprove, reprimand, admonish, reproach, chide Analogous words: rate, upbraid, *scold, berate: *criticize, reprehend, reprobate …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 6 rebuke — ► VERB ▪ criticize or reprimand sharply. ► NOUN ▪ a sharp criticism. ORIGIN Old French rebuker beat down …

    English terms dictionary

  • 7 rebuke — [ri byo͞ok′] vt. rebuked, rebuking [ME rebuken < Anglo Fr rebuker < OFr rebuchier < re , back + buchier, to beat < buche, stick, billet < Gmc * buska] 1. to blame or scold in a sharp way; reprimand 2. Obs. to force back n. a sharp… …

    English World dictionary

  • 8 rebuke — I n. 1) to administer, deliver, give a rebuke 2) to draw, receive a rebuke 3) a mild; scathing, sharp, stern, stinging rebuke 4) a rebuke to II v. 1) to rebuke mildly; sharply, sternly 2) (D; tr.) to rebuke for (to rebuke smb. for sloppy work) *… …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 9 rebuke — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun ADJECTIVE ▪ harsh, scathing, sharp, stern, stinging, strong ▪ gentle, mild ▪ …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 10 rebuke — UK [rɪˈbjuːk] / US [rɪˈbjuk] verb [transitive] Word forms rebuke : present tense I/you/we/they rebuke he/she/it rebukes present participle rebuking past tense rebuked past participle rebuked formal to tell someone that they have behaved badly.… …

    English dictionary

  • 11 rebuke — {{11}}rebuke (n.) early 15c., a reproof, reprimand, from REBUKE (Cf. rebuke) (v.). {{12}}rebuke (v.) early 14c., to reprimand, reprove; chide, scold, from Anglo Fr. rebuker to repel, beat back, O.Fr. rebuchier, from re back (see RE (Cf. re )) +… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 12 rebuke — [[t]rɪbju͟ːk[/t]] rebukes, rebuking, rebuked VERB If you rebuke someone, you speak severely to them because they have said or done something that you do not approve of. [FORMAL] [V n] The president rebuked the House and Senate for not passing… …

    English dictionary

  • 13 rebuke — 1. verb she never rebuked him in front of others Syn: reprimand, reproach, scold, admonish, reprove, chastise, upbraid, berate, take to task, criticize, censure; informal tell off, give someone a talking to, give someone a dressing down, give… …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 14 rebuke — re|buke [rıˈbju:k] v [T] [Date: 1300 1400; : Old North French; Origin: rebuker, from bukier to hit, cut down ] formal to speak to someone severely about something they have done wrong = ↑reprimand rebuke sb for doing sth ▪ Members of the jury… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 15 rebuke — verb (T) formal to speak to someone severely, about something they have done wrong: rebuke sb for doing sth: Father Cary rebuked her for using bad language. rebuke noun (C, U): a stern rebuke …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 16 Rebuke — In English law and the canon law of the Church of England, a rebuke is a censure on a member of the clergy. [Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction Measure 1963, [http://www.uk legislation.hmso.gov.uk/RevisedStatutes/Acts/ukcm/1963/cukcm 19630001 en 8#pt8… …

    Wikipedia

  • 17 rebuke — I. transitive verb (rebuked; rebuking) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French rebucher, rebouker to blunt, check, reprimand Date: 14th century 1. a. to criticize sharply ; reprimand b. to serve as a rebuke to 2. to turn back or keep down ; …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 18 rebuke — 1. verb she never rebuked him Syn: reprimand, reproach, scold, admonish; informal tell off; Brit.; informal tick off; N.Amer.; informal chew out Ant: praise 2. noun a severe rebuke Syn …

    Synonyms and antonyms dictionary

  • 19 rebuke — [rɪˈbjuːk] verb [T] formal to tell someone angrily that they have behaved badly rebuke noun [C] …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • 20 rebuke — rebukable, adj. rebuker, n. rebukingly, adv. /ri byoohk /, v., rebuked, rebuking, n. v.t. 1. to express sharp, stern disapproval of; reprove; reprimand. n. 2. sharp, stern disapproval; reproof; reprimand. [1275 1325; ME rebuken (v.) < AF rebuker… …

    Universalium