raze

  • 1 Raze — Raze …

    Deutsch Wikipedia

  • 2 Raze — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Raze Bandera …

    Wikipedia Español

  • 3 Raze — (Паланга,Литва) Категория отеля: 3 звездочный отель Адрес: Vytauto g. 74, LT 00132 Паланга, Лит …

    Каталог отелей

  • 4 Raze — may refer to: * Demolition * Raze, Haute Saône, a town in France * Raze (house music group) * Raze (Christian pop group) * Raze (Underworld), a fictional character in the Underworld films …

    Wikipedia

  • 5 Raze — (r[=a]z), n. [See {Race}.] A Shakespearean word (used once) supposed to mean the same as race, a root. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 Raze — Raze, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Razed} (r[=a]zd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Razing}.] [F. raser. See {Rase}, v. t.] [Written also {rase}.] 1. To erase; to efface; to obliterate. [1913 Webster] Razing the characters of your renown. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 raze — index abolish, destroy (efface), devastate, eliminate (eradicate), expunge, extinguish, extirpate …

    Law dictionary

  • 8 raze — [reız] v [T usually passive] [Date: 1500 1600; : Old French; Origin: raser, from Latin radere to scrape, shave ] to completely destroy a town or building ▪ In 1162 Milan was razed to the ground by imperial troops …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 9 raze — [ reız ] verb transitive to completely destroy a building or town: The troops attacked his village and razed it to the ground …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 10 raze — (v.) 1540s, alteration of racen pull or knock down (a building or town), from earlier rasen (14c.) to scratch, slash, scrape, erase, from O.Fr. raser to scrape, shave, from M.L. rasare, frequentative of L. radere (pp. rasus) to scrape, shave,… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 11 raze — demolish, *destroy Analogous words: efface, obliterate (see ERASE): eradicate, extirpate (see EXTERMINATE): *ruin, wreck: *abolish, extinguish, annihilate …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 12 raze — is now the standard spelling for the verb meaning ‘to destroy or tear down’ (as in The building was razed to the ground), not rase …

    Modern English usage

  • 13 raze — [v] flatten, knock down; wipe out batter, blow down, bomb, break down, bulldoze, capsize, cast down, crash, decimate, delete, demolish, destroy, dynamite, efface, erase, expunge, extinguish, extirpate, fell, level, mow down, obliterate, overthrow …

    New thesaurus

  • 14 raze — (also rase) ► VERB ▪ tear down and destroy (a building, town, etc.). ORIGIN Old French raser shave closely , from Latin radere scrape …

    English terms dictionary

  • 15 raze — [rāz] vt. razed, razing [ME rasen < OFr raser < VL * rasare, to shave, scrape, freq. < L rasus, pp. of radere, to scrape: see RAT] 1. Archaic to scrape or graze; wound slightly 2. Now Rare to scrape or shave off; erase 3. to tear down… …

    English World dictionary

  • 16 Raze — 47° 35′ 04″ N 6° 00′ 44″ E / 47.5844444444, 6.01222222222 …

    Wikipédia en Français

  • 17 raze — Rase Rase (r[=a]z), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Rased} (r[=a]zd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Rasing}.] [F. raser, LL. rasare to scrape often, v. freq. fr. L. radere, rasum, to scrape, shave; cf. Skr. rad to scratch, gnaw, L. rodere to gnaw. Cf. {Raze}, {Razee},… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 18 raze — v. (D; tr.) to raze to (to raze a building to the ground) * * * [reɪz] (D; tr.) to raze to (to raze a building to the ground) …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 19 raze — UK [reɪz] / US verb [transitive] Word forms raze : present tense I/you/we/they raze he/she/it razes present participle razing past tense razed past participle razed to completely destroy a building or town The troops attacked his village and… …

    English dictionary

  • 20 raze — transitive verb (razed; razing) Etymology: alteration of rase Date: 1536 1. a. archaic erase b. to scrape, cut, or shave off 2. to destroy to the ground ; demolish < raze an old build …

    New Collegiate Dictionary