quash

  • 1 quash — / kwäsh, kwȯsh/ vt [Anglo French quasser, from Middle French casser quasser, from Late Latin cassare, from Latin cassus void]: to make void: annul (2) quash a subpoena Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 Quash — Quash, v. t. [OF. quasser, F. casser, fr. L. quassare to shake, shatter, shiver, v. intens. fr. quatere, quassum, to shake, shatter. Cf. {Concussion}, {Discuss}, {Rescue}, and also {Quash} to annul.] 1. To beat down, or beat in pieces; to dash… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 quash — [kwɒʆ ǁ kwɑːʆ, kwɒːʆ] verb [transitive] 1. LAW to officially state that a judgement or decision is no longer legal or correct: • He was found guilty but had his conviction quashed later on appeal. 2. to stop something from starting or developing …

    Financial and business terms

  • 4 Quash — Quash, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Quashed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Quashing}.] [OF. quasser, F. casser, fr. L. cassare to annihilate, annul, fr. cassus empty, vain, of uncertain origin. The word has been confused with L. quassare to shake, F. casser to break …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 quash — [ kwaʃ ] verb transitive FORMAL 1. ) to say officially that a decision made by another court was wrong and no longer has legal force: The appellate court quashed the subpoena for the witness. 2. ) to use force or violence to stop the political… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 6 Quash — Quash, v. i. To be shaken, or dashed about, with noise. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 Quash — Quash, n. Same as {Squash}. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8 quash — [kwɔʃ US kwa:ʃ, kwo:ʃ] v [T] formal [Sense: 1; Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: quasser, from Late Latin cassare, from Latin cassus having no effect, void ] [Sense: 2; Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: quasser, from Latin quassare to… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 9 quash — [v1] destroy, defeat annihilate, beat, crush, extinguish, extirpate, overcome, overthrow, put down, quell, quench, repress, scrunch*, snow under*, squash*, squish*, subdue, suppress, trash; concepts 95,252 Ant. aid, assist, help, rebuild quash… …

    New thesaurus

  • 10 quash — (v.) to make void, annul, crush, early 14c., from O.Fr. quasser to break, smash, from L. quassare to shatter, frequentative of quatere to shake (pp. quassus). Meaning suppress is from M.L. quassare make null and void, from L. cassus empty, void,… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 11 quash — 1 *annul, abrogate, void, vacate 2 *crush, quell, extinguish, suppress, quench Analogous words: *destroy: *ruin, wreck: *suppress, repress …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 12 quash — ► VERB 1) reject as invalid, especially by legal procedure. 2) put an end to; suppress. ORIGIN Old French quasser annul , from Latin cassus null, void …

    English terms dictionary

  • 13 quash — quash1 [kwäsh, kwôsh] vt. [altered (infl. by QUASH2) < ME quassen < MFr quasser < LL cassare, to annihilate, destroy < L cassus, empty < castus, pp. of carere, to lack: see CASTE] Law to annul or set aside (an indictment) quash2… …

    English World dictionary

  • 14 quash — UK [kwɒʃ] / US [kwɑʃ] verb [transitive] Word forms quash : present tense I/you/we/they quash he/she/it quashes present participle quashing past tense quashed past participle quashed formal 1) to use force or violence to stop the political action… …

    English dictionary

  • 15 quash — I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English quashen to smash, from Anglo French quasser, casser, from Latin quassare to shake violently, shatter, frequentative of quatere to shake Date: 13th century to suppress or extinguish summarily and… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 16 quash — verb Quash is used with these nouns as the subject: ↑court Quash is used with these nouns as the object: ↑conviction, ↑decision, ↑dissent, ↑rumour, ↑sentence, ↑speculation, ↑verdict …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 17 quash — [14] Quash goes back ultimately to Latin quatere ‘shake’ (source also of English rescue [14], which etymologically means ‘shake off, drive away’, and of concussion and percussion). From it evolved quassāre ‘shake to pieces, break’, which passed… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 18 quash — [[t]kwɒ̱ʃ[/t]] quashes, quashing, quashed 1) VERB If a court or someone in authority quashes a decision or judgement, they officially reject it. [V n] The Appeal Court has quashed the convictions of all eleven people. Syn: overturn 2) VERB If… …

    English dictionary

  • 19 quash — verb 1) the judge may quash the sentence Syn: cancel, reverse, rescind, repeal, revoke, retract, countermand, withdraw, overturn, overrule, veto, annul, nullify, invalidate, negate, void; Law vacate; formal abrogate …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 20 quash — mus·quash; quash; …

    English syllables