put up with

  • 1 put up with — {v.} To accept patiently; bear. * /We had to put up with Jim s poor table manners because he refused to change./ * /The mother told her children, I refuse to put up with your tracking in mud! / Compare: STAND FOR …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 2 put up with — {v.} To accept patiently; bear. * /We had to put up with Jim s poor table manners because he refused to change./ * /The mother told her children, I refuse to put up with your tracking in mud! / Compare: STAND FOR …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 3 put up with — phrasal to endure or tolerate without complaint or attempt at reprisal …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 4 To put up with — Put Put (put; often p[u^]t in def. 3), v. i. 1. To go or move; as, when the air first puts up. [Obs.] Bacon. [1913 Webster] 2. To steer; to direct one s course; to go. [1913 Webster] His fury thus appeased, he puts to land. Dryden. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 Put — Put, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Put}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Putting}.] [AS. potian to thrust: cf. Dan. putte to put, to put into, Fries. putje; perh. akin to W. pwtio to butt, poke, thrust; cf. also Gael. put to push, thrust, and E. potter, v. i.] 1. To… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6

  • 7 Put case — Put Put, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Put}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Putting}.] [AS. potian to thrust: cf. Dan. putte to put, to put into, Fries. putje; perh. akin to W. pwtio to butt, poke, thrust; cf. also Gael. put to push, thrust, and E. potter, v. i.] 1. To …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8 Put — (put; often p[u^]t in def. 3), v. i. 1. To go or move; as, when the air first puts up. [Obs.] Bacon. [1913 Webster] 2. To steer; to direct one s course; to go. [1913 Webster] His fury thus appeased, he puts to land. Dryden. [1913 Webster] 3. To… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 9 Put–call parity — In financial mathematics, put call parity defines a relationship between the price of a call option and a put option both with the identical strike price and expiry. To derive the put call parity relationship, the assumption is that the options… …

    Wikipedia

  • 10 put up — {v.} 1a. To make and pack (especially a lunch or medicine); get ready; prepare. * /Every morning Mother puts up lunches for the three children./ * /The druggist put up the medicine that the doctor had prescribed./ Compare: MAKE UP(1). 1b. To put… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 11 put up — {v.} 1a. To make and pack (especially a lunch or medicine); get ready; prepare. * /Every morning Mother puts up lunches for the three children./ * /The druggist put up the medicine that the doctor had prescribed./ Compare: MAKE UP(1). 1b. To put… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 12 put one's foot in it — or[put one s foot in one s mouth] {v. phr.}, {informal} To speak carelessly and rudely; hurt another s feelings without intending to; make a rude mistake. * /He put his foot in it with his remark about self made men because Jones was one of… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 13 put one's foot in it — or[put one s foot in one s mouth] {v. phr.}, {informal} To speak carelessly and rudely; hurt another s feelings without intending to; make a rude mistake. * /He put his foot in it with his remark about self made men because Jones was one of… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 14 put two and two together — {v. phr.} To make decisions based on available proofs; reason from the known facts; conclude; decide. * /He had put two and two together and decided where they had probably gone./ * /It was just a mater of putting two and two together: the facts… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 15 put two and two together — {v. phr.} To make decisions based on available proofs; reason from the known facts; conclude; decide. * /He had put two and two together and decided where they had probably gone./ * /It was just a mater of putting two and two together: the facts… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 16 put on the dog — {v. phr.} To behave ostentatiously in terms of dress and manner. * / Stop putting on the dog with me, Sue cried at Roy. I knew the real you from way hack! / …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 17 put on the dog — {v. phr.} To behave ostentatiously in terms of dress and manner. * / Stop putting on the dog with me, Sue cried at Roy. I knew the real you from way hack! / …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 18 put the cart before the horse — See: CART BEFORE THE HORSE …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 19

  • 20 Put-in-Bay, Ohio — Infobox Settlement official name = Put in Bay, Ohio other name = native name = nickname = settlement type = Village motto = imagesize = 250px image caption = Put in Bay, Ohio, looking out towards Lake Erie flag size = image seal size = image… …

    Wikipedia