pull toward

  • 1 pull|y — «PUL ee», adjective, pull|i|er, pull|i|est. inclined to pull toward one; demanding: »People often get too close, too pully on you (New Yorker) …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 2 pull — [pool] vt. [ME pullen < OE pullian, to pluck, snatch with the fingers: ? akin to MLowG pull, a husk, shell] 1. to exert force or influence on so as to cause to move toward or after the source of the force; drag, tug, draw, attract, etc. 2. a)… …

    English World dictionary

  • 3 Pull — Pull, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pulled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pulling}.] [AS. pullian; cf. LG. pulen, and Gael. peall, piol, spiol.] 1. To draw, or attempt to draw, toward one; to draw forcibly. [1913 Webster] Ne er pull your hat upon your brows. Shak.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 pull — vb Pull, draw, drag, haul, hale, tug, tow mean to cause to move in the direction determined by the person or thing that exerts force. Pull, the general term, is often accompanied by an adverb or adverbial phrase to indicate the direction {two… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 5 Pull-up resistor — Pull up resistors are used in electronic logic circuits to ensure that inputs to logic systems settle at expected logic levels if external devices are disconnected. Pull up resistors may also be used at the interface between two different types… …

    Wikipedia

  • 6 Pull — Pull, n. 1. The act of pulling or drawing with force; an effort to move something by drawing toward one. [1913 Webster] I awakened with a violent pull upon the ring which was fastened at the top of my box. Swift. [1913 Webster] 2. A contest; a… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 pull — pull1 [ pul ] verb *** ▸ 1 move someone/something toward you ▸ 2 remove something attached ▸ 3 move body with force ▸ 4 injure muscle ▸ 5 take gun/knife out ▸ 6 move window cover ▸ 7 make someone want to do something ▸ 8 get votes ▸ 9 suck smoke… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 8 pull — I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English pullian; akin to Middle Low German pulen to shell, cull Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. a. to exert force upon so as to cause or tend to cause motion toward the force b. to stretch… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 9 pull — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun 1 act of pulling ADJECTIVE ▪ sharp ▪ strong ▪ gentle, slight ▪ downward ▪ gravitati …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 10 Pull-up (exercise) — A pull up is an upper body compound pulling exercise where the body is suspended by the arms, gripping something, and pulled up with muscular effort. As this happens, the wrists remain in neutral (straight, neither flexed or extended) position,… …

    Wikipedia

  • 11 pull — pullable, adj. puller, n. /pool/, v.t. 1. to draw or haul toward oneself or itself, in a particular direction, or into a particular position: to pull a sled up a hill. 2. to draw or tug at with force. 3. to rend or tear: to pull a cloth to pieces …

    Universalium

  • 12 pull — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n. power, sway; jerk, wrench, tug; magnetism, gravity, attraction;slang, influence. v. tug, wrench, haul, drag, draw; extract; row, paddle; tow. See extraction, exertion, traction. II (Roget s IV) n. 1.… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 13 pull — [[t]pʊl[/t]] v. t. 1) to draw or haul toward oneself or itself, in a particular direction, or into a particular position 2) to draw or tug at with force 3) to rend; tear: to pull a cloth to pieces[/ex] 4) to draw or pluck away from a place of… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 14 pull in — verb 1. direct toward itself or oneself by means of some psychological power or physical attributes (Freq. 4) Her good looks attract the stares of many men The ad pulled in many potential customers This pianist pulls huge crowds The store owner… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 15 pull — 1. verb 1) he pulled the box toward him Syn: tug, haul, drag, draw, tow, heave, lug, jerk, wrench; informal yank Ant: push 2) he pulled the bad tooth out Syn …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 16 pull — 1. verb /pʊl/ a) to apply a force to (an object) so that it comes toward the person or thing applying the force Hes pulled that bird over there. b) to persuade (someone) to have sex with one<! or to be on the pull (willing to have sex) Each… …

    Wiktionary

  • 17 pull an oar — verb To contribute toward a group effort …

    Wiktionary

  • 18 To pull a finch — Pull Pull, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pulled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pulling}.] [AS. pullian; cf. LG. pulen, and Gael. peall, piol, spiol.] 1. To draw, or attempt to draw, toward one; to draw forcibly. [1913 Webster] Ne er pull your hat upon your brows.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 19 To pull and haul — Pull Pull, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pulled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pulling}.] [AS. pullian; cf. LG. pulen, and Gael. peall, piol, spiol.] 1. To draw, or attempt to draw, toward one; to draw forcibly. [1913 Webster] Ne er pull your hat upon your brows.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 20 To pull down — Pull Pull, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pulled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pulling}.] [AS. pullian; cf. LG. pulen, and Gael. peall, piol, spiol.] 1. To draw, or attempt to draw, toward one; to draw forcibly. [1913 Webster] Ne er pull your hat upon your brows.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English