prosecute

  • 1 prosecute — pros·e·cute / prä si ˌkyüt/ vb cut·ed, cut·ing [Latin prosecutus, past participle of prosequi to pursue] vt 1: to institute and carry forward legal action against for redress or esp. punishment of a crime 2: to institute and carry on a lawsuit… …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 Prosecute — Pros e*cute, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Prosecuted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Prosecuting}.] [L. prosecutus, p. p. of prosequi to follow, pursue. See {Pursue}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To follow or pursue with a view to reach, execute, or accomplish; to endeavor to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 prosecute — pros‧e‧cute [ˈprɒsɪkjuːt ǁ ˈprɑː ] verb [intransitive, transitive] LAW 1. if the state authorities prosecute someone, they officially say that person must be judged by a court of law for a particular crime: • Shoplifters (= people who steal… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 4 prosecute — [präs′ə kyo͞ot΄] vt. prosecuted, prosecuting [ME prosecuten < L prosecutus, pp. of prosequi < pro , PRO 2 + sequi, to follow: see SEQUENT] 1. to follow up or pursue (something) to a conclusion [to prosecute a war with vigor] 2. to carry on; …

    English World dictionary

  • 5 Prosecute — Pros e*cute, v. i. 1. To follow after. [Obs.] Latimer. [1913 Webster] 2. (Law) To institute and carry on a legal prosecution; as, to prosecute for public offenses. Blackstone. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 prosecute — [v1] bring action against in court arraign, bring suit, bring to trial, contest, do, haul into court*, indict, involve in litigation, law, litigate, prefer charges, pull up, put away*, put on docket, put on trial, see in court*, seek redress, sue …

    New thesaurus

  • 7 prosecute — early 15c., follow up, pursue (some course or action), from L. prosecutus, pp. of prosequi follow after (see PURSUE (Cf. pursue)). Meaning bring to a court of law is first recorded 1570s. Prosecutor in legal sense is attested from 1660s;… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 8 prosecute — ► VERB 1) institute legal proceedings against (someone) or with reference to (a crime). 2) continue (a course of action) with a view to completion. 3) archaic carry on (a trade or pursuit). DERIVATIVES prosecutable adjective. ORIGIN Latin… …

    English terms dictionary

  • 9 prosecute — v. 1) to prosecute vigorously 2) (D; tr.) to prosecute for (to prosecute smb. for murder) * * * [ prɒsɪkjuːt] to prosecute vigorously (D;tr.) to prosecute for (to prosecute smb. for murder) …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 10 prosecute */ — UK [ˈprɒsɪˌkjuːt] / US [ˈprɑsɪˌkjut] verb Word forms prosecute : present tense I/you/we/they prosecute he/she/it prosecutes present participle prosecuting past tense prosecuted past participle prosecuted 1) [intransitive/transitive] to officially …

    English dictionary

  • 11 prosecute — [[t]prɒ̱sɪkjuːt[/t]] prosecutes, prosecuting, prosecuted 1) VERB If the authorities prosecute someone, they charge them with a crime and put them on trial. The police have decided not to prosecute because the evidence is not strong enough... [V n …

    English dictionary

  • 12 prosecute — pros|e|cute [ˈprɔsıkju:t US ˈpra: ] v [Date: 1400 1500; : Latin; Origin: , past participle of prosequi to follow and try to catch ] 1.) [I and T] to charge someone with a crime and try to show that they are guilty of it in a court of law ▪… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 13 prosecute — pros|e|cute [ prası,kjut ] verb * 1. ) intransitive or transitive to officially accuse someone of a crime and ask a court of law to judge them: No one has yet been prosecuted in connection with the murder. If the fine is not paid within ten days …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 14 prosecute — verb 1 (I, T) to officially say that someone is guilty of a crime and must be judged by a court of law: Shoplifters will be prosecuted. | prosecute sb for sth: Buxton s being prosecuted for assault. | If payment is not received by 1 March we ll… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 15 prosecute — verb ( cuted; cuting) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin prosecutus, past participle of prosequi to pursue more at pursue Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to follow to the end ; pursue until finished < was…ordered to prosecute the war… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 16 prosecute — 01. The police decided not to [prosecute] because they didn t have enough evidence. 02. The [prosecutor] asked the judge for a 5 year prison sentence for the man accused of raping a young woman. 03. Boxer Mike Tyson was [prosecuted] for raping a… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 17 prosecute — verb 1) they prosecute offenders Syn: take to court, bring/institute legal proceedings against, bring an action against, take legal action against, sue, try, impeach, bring to trial, put on trial, put in the dock, bring a suit against, indict,… …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 18 prosecute — prosecutable, adj. prosecutability, n. /pros i kyooht /, v., prosecuted, prosecuting. v.t. 1. Law. a. to institute legal proceedings against (a person). b. to seek to enforce or obtain by legal process. c. to conduct criminal proceedings in court …

    Universalium

  • 19 prosecute — See persecute. See persecute, prosecute …

    Dictionary of problem words and expressions

  • 20 prosecute — verb Prosecute is used with these nouns as the object: ↑case, ↑crime, ↑criminal, ↑defendant …

    Collocations dictionary