proffer

  • 1 proffer — I verb adduce, advance, advertise, bid, bring forward, donate, extend, give, hold out, invite, lay before, make a bid, make a motion, make an offer, make an overture, make possible, move, offer, prefer, present, promise, promittere, propose,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 Proffer — Prof fer, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Proffered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Proffering}.] [OE. profren, proferen, F. prof[ e]rer, fr. L. proferre to bring forth or forward, to offer; pro forward + ferre to bring. See {Bear} to produce.] 1. To offer for… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 Proffer — Prof fer, n. 1. An offer made; something proposed for acceptance by another; a tender; as, proffers of peace or friendship. [1913 Webster] He made a proffer to lay down his commission. Clarendon. [1913 Webster] 2. Essay; attempt. [R.] Bacon.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 proffer — [präf′ər] vt. [ME profren < Anglo Fr & OFr proffrir < poroffrir < por , PRO 2 + offrir < VL * offerire, for L offerre, to OFFER] to offer (usually something intangible) [to proffer friendship] n. [ME & Anglo Fr profre < the v.] an… …

    English World dictionary

  • 5 proffer — (v.) late 13c., from Anglo Fr. profrier (mid 13c.), O.Fr. poroffrir (c.1080), from por forth (from L. pro ) + offrir to offer, from L. offerre (see OFFER (Cf. offer)). Related: Proffered; proffering …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 6 proffer — *offer, tender, present, prefer Analogous words: propose, design, intend: confer, bestow, present, *give Contrasted words: reject, spurn, refuse, *decline …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 7 proffer — meaning ‘to offer (a gift or service)’, has inflected forms proffered, proffering …

    Modern English usage

  • 8 proffer — [v] suggest, offer extend, gift, give, hand, hit on, hold out, make a pitch*, pose, present, propose, proposition, propound, submit, tender, volunteer; concepts 66,67,75 Ant. discourage, dissuade, take back …

    New thesaurus

  • 9 proffer — ► VERB ▪ offer for acceptance. ORIGIN Old French proffrir, from Latin pro before + offerre to offer …

    English terms dictionary

  • 10 Proffer — To proffer (sometimes profer) means to offer evidence in support of an argument, or elements of an affirmative defense or offense, often at trial. A party with the burden of proof must proffer sufficient evidence to carry that burden.For example …

    Wikipedia

  • 11 proffer — 1. noun a) An offer made; something proposed for acceptance by another; a tender; as, proffers of peace or friendship. b) Essay; attempt. 2. verb a) …

    Wiktionary

  • 12 Proffer — Recorded in various spellings including Proffet, Profit, Proffitt, Prophet, and probably Proffer, this is a 13th century English surname, but one of pre medieval French origins. It was one presumably introduced after the Norman Conquest and… …

    Surnames reference

  • 13 proffer — [[t]prɒ̱fə(r)[/t]] proffers, proffering, proffered 1) VERB If you proffer something to someone, you hold it towards them so that they can take it or touch it. [FORMAL] [V n] He rose and proffered a silver box full of cigarettes. [Also V n to n]… …

    English dictionary

  • 14 proffer — verb (T) formal 1 to offer something to someone, especially by holding it out in your hands: Sarah sipped from the glass proffered by the attendant. | proffer sb sth: Poirot proffered him a cigarette. 2 to give someone advice, an explanation, etc …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 15 proffer — UK [ˈprɒfə(r)] / US [ˈprɑfər] verb [transitive] Word forms proffer : present tense I/you/we/they proffer he/she/it proffers present participle proffering past tense proffered past participle proffered formal 1) to offer someone something by… …

    English dictionary

  • 16 proffer — verb Proffer is used with these nouns as the object: ↑resignation …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 17 proffer — prof|fer [ˈprɔfə US ˈpra:fər] v [T] formal [Date: 1200 1300; : Anglo French; Origin: profrer, from Old French poroffrir, from por forward + offrir to offer ] 1.) to offer something to someone, especially by holding it out in your hands ▪ Sarah… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 18 proffer — I. transitive verb (proffered; proffering) Etymology: Middle English profren, from Anglo French profrer, proffrir, porofrir, from por forth (from Latin pro ) + offrir to offer more at pro Date: 14th century to present for acceptance ; tender,… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 19 proffer — profferer, n. /prof euhr/, v.t. 1. to put before a person for acceptance; offer. n. 2. the act of proffering. 3. an offer or proposal. [1250 1300; ME profren < AF profrer, var. of OF poroffrir, equiv. to por PRO 1 + offrir to OFFER] Syn. 1.… …

    Universalium

  • 20 proffer — Synonyms and related words: accord, administer, advance, afford, allot, allow, approach, asking price, award, bestow, bestow on, bid, communicate, confer, deal, deal out, dish out, dispense, dole, dole out, donate, extend, feeler, fork out, gift …

    Moby Thesaurus