proclaim

  • 1 Proclaim — Pro*claim , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Proclaimed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Proclaiming}.] [OE. proclamen, L. proclamare; pro before, forward + clamare to call or cry out: cf. F. proclamer. See {Claim}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To make known by public announcement; …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 proclaim — pro·claim /prō klām/ vt: to declare or declare to be solemnly, officially, or formally proclaim an amnesty Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. proclaim …

    Law dictionary

  • 3 proclaim — (v.) late 14c., from L. proclamare cry or call out, from pro forth (see PRO (Cf. pro )) + clamare to cry out (see CLAIM (Cf. claim) (v.)). Related: Proclaimed; proclaiming …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 4 proclaim — *declare, announce, publish, advertise, promulgate, broadcast Analogous words: *reveal, disclose, discover, divulge, tell: voice, utter, vent, ventilate (see EXPRESS vb): *inform, apprise …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 5 proclaim — [v] advertise, make known affirm, announce, annunciate, blast, blaze, blazon, broadcast, call, circulate, declare, demonstrate, disseminate, enunciate, evidence, evince, exhibit, expound, get on a soapbox*, give out, herald, illustrate, indicate …

    New thesaurus

  • 6 proclaim — ► VERB 1) announce officially or publicly. 2) declare (someone) officially or publicly to be. 3) indicate clearly. DERIVATIVES proclamation noun. ORIGIN Latin proclamare cry out …

    English terms dictionary

  • 7 proclaim — [prō klām′, prəklām′] vt. [ME proclamen < MFr proclamer < L proclamare < pro , before + clamare, to cry out: see PRO 1 & CLAMOR] 1. to announce officially; announce to be 2. to show to be [acts that proclaimed him a friend] 3. Rare to… …

    English World dictionary

  • 8 Proclaim! — infobox television show name = Proclaim! caption = format = News program, Catholic Mass runtime = Proclaim! 30 Minutes Altoona Johnstown Diocese Mass 60 Minutes creator = Deacon John Sroka host = Rev. Chuck Bridges, Bishop Joseph V. Adamec,… …

    Wikipedia

  • 9 proclaim */ — UK [prəˈkleɪm] / US verb [transitive] Word forms proclaim : present tense I/you/we/they proclaim he/she/it proclaims present participle proclaiming past tense proclaimed past participle proclaimed 1) a) to state something publicly Abbot has… …

    English dictionary

  • 10 proclaim — Announce An*nounce , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Announced}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Announcing}.] [OF. anoncier, F. annoncer, fr. L. annuntiare; ad + nuntiare to report, relate, nuntius messenger, bearer of news. See {Nuncio}, and cf. {Annunciate}.] [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 11 proclaim — verb ADVERB ▪ loudly ▪ formally, officially ▪ openly, publicly ▪ proudly, triumphantly …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 12 proclaim — pro|claim [ prə kleım ] verb transitive * 1. ) to state something publicly: Abbot has always proclaimed his innocence of the charges. proclaim (that): They still proclaim that their policy was successful. proclaim someone/something (to be)… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 13 proclaim — proclaimer, n. /proh klaym , preuh /, v.t. 1. to announce or declare in an official or formal manner: to proclaim war. 2. to announce or declare in an open or ostentatious way: to proclaim one s opinions. 3. to indicate or make known publicly or… …

    Universalium

  • 14 proclaim — 01. On December 10, 1948, the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted and [proclaimed] the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. 02. On June 19, 1865, a [proclamation] was made in Texas that all slaves are free. 03. Jason White has… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 15 proclaim — transitive verb Etymology: Middle English proclamen, from Anglo French or Latin; Anglo French proclamer, from Latin proclamare, from pro before + clamare to cry out more at pro , claim Date: 14th century 1. a. to declare publicly, typically… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 16 proclaim — pro|claim [prəˈkleım US prou ] v [T] formal [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: proclamer, from Latin proclamare, from clamare to cry out ] 1.) to say publicly or officially that something important is true or exists →↑proclamation ▪ The… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 17 proclaim — [[t]proʊkle͟ɪm[/t]] proclaims, proclaiming, proclaimed 1) VERB If people proclaim something, they formally make it known to the public. [V n] The Boers rebelled against British rule, proclaiming their independence on 30 December 1880... [V that]… …

    English dictionary

  • 18 proclaim — verb (T) formal 1 to say publicly that something important is true or exists: Their religion encouraged them to proclaim their faith. | A national holiday was proclaimed. | proclaim sb sth: His son was immediately proclaimed king. 2 to show… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 19 proclaim — /prəˈkleɪm / (say pruh klaym) verb (t) 1. to announce or declare publicly or officiously: to proclaim one s opinions. 2. to announce or declare, publicly and officially: to proclaim war. 3. (of things) to indicate or make known. 4. to declare (a… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 20 proclaim —   Kūkala, kala, kalakū, ho opuka, kuahaua, polo ai;    ♦ proclaim a law, lāhui (rare) …

    English-Hawaiian dictionary