prevent

  • 1 prevent — 1 Prevent, anticipate, forestall can mean to be or get ahead of or to deal with beforehand, with reference especially to a thing s due time or to its actual occurrence or to the action of another. Prevent implies frustration (as of an intention… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 2 prevent — When prevent is followed by an object + verbal noun, the usual construction now is (for example) prevent him going or prevent him from going, rather than prevent his going, which (though considered formally more correct by some) is falling out of …

    Modern English usage

  • 3 PReVENT — is a European automotive industry activity co funded by the European Commission to contribute to road safety by developing and demonstrating preventive safety applications and technologies. Preventive and active safety applications help drivers… …

    Wikipedia

  • 4 Prevent — Pre*vent , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Prevented}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Preventing}.] [L. praevenire, praeventum; prae before + venire to come. See {Come}.] 1. To go before; to precede; hence, to go before as a guide; to direct. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] We… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 prevent — I verb arrest, avert, avoid, baffle, balk, bar, block, check, checkmate, circumvent, contest, counter, counteract, countercheck, cut off, debar, defeat, deflect, delay, detain, deter, discourage, estop, fend off, foil, forbid, foreclose,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 6 prevent — pre‧vent [prɪˈvent] verb [transitive] to stop something happening, or someone doing something: • government regulators working to prevent fraud prevent somebody/​something (from) doing something • The region s huge economic problems will prevent… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 7 prevent — [prē vent′, privent′] vt. [ME preventen < L praeventus, pp. of praevenire, to anticipate < prae , before (see PRE ) + venire, to COME] 1. Obs. a) to act in anticipation of (an event or a fixed time) b) to anticipate (a need, objection,… …

    English World dictionary

  • 8 Prevent — Pre*vent , v. i. To come before the usual time. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Strawberries . . . will prevent and come early. Bacon. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 9 prevent — (v.) early 15c., to act in anticipation of, from L. praeventus, pp. of praevenire come before, anticipate, hinder, in L.L. also to prevent, from prae before (see PRE (Cf. pre )) + venire to come (see VENUE (Cf. venue)). Originally literal; sense… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 10 prevent — [v] keep from happening or continuing anticipate, arrest, avert, avoid, baffle, balk, bar, block, check, chill*, cool, cork, counter, counteract, dam, debar, defend against, foil, forbid, forestall, forfend, frustrate, halt, hamper, head off,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 11 prevent — ► VERB 1) keep from happening or arising. 2) stop (someone) from doing something. ● prevention is better than cure Cf. ↑prevention is better than cure DERIVATIVES preventable adjective prevention …

    English terms dictionary

  • 12 prevent */*/*/ — UK [prɪˈvent] / US verb [transitive] Word forms prevent : present tense I/you/we/they prevent he/she/it prevents present participle preventing past tense prevented past participle prevented Get it right: prevent: The verb prevent is never… …

    English dictionary

  • 13 prevent — verb ADVERB ▪ effectively ▪ This new legislation effectively prevents us from trading. ▪ reliably, successfully ▪ a study to determine whether the brace can reliably prevent knee injuries ▪ …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 14 prevent — v. 1) (D; tr.) to prevent from (nothing can prevent this disease from spreading) 2) (BE) (J) nothing can prevent this disease spreading 3) (K) you cannot prevent her getting married * * * [prɪ vent] (BE) (J) nothing can prevent this disease… …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 15 prevent — 01. Her parents tried to [prevent] her from marrying her boyfriend, but she went ahead with the wedding anyway. 02. A snowstorm [prevented] us from going out. 03. The scientist discovered a drug which has been quite successful in [preventing]… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 16 prevent — pre|vent [ prı vent ] verb transitive *** 1. ) to stop something from happening: Regular cleaning may help prevent infection. prevent something (from) happening: Rubber seals are fitted to prevent the gas from escaping. If necessary, add a little …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 17 prevent — [[t]prɪve̱nt[/t]] ♦♦ prevents, preventing, prevented 1) VERB To prevent something means to ensure that it does not happen. [V n] These methods prevent pregnancy... [V n from ing] Further treatment will prevent cancer from developing... [V n ing]… …

    English dictionary

  • 18 prevent — preventable, preventible, adj. preventabilty, n. preventingly, adv. /pri vent /, v.t. 1. to keep from occurring; avert; hinder: He intervened to prevent bloodshed. 2. to hinder or stop from doing something: There is nothing to prevent us from… …

    Universalium

  • 19 prevent — pre•vent [[t]prɪˈvɛnt[/t]] v. t. 1) to keep from occurring; stop: to prevent illness[/ex] 2) to stop from doing something: There is nothing to prevent us from going[/ex] 3) archaic a) to act ahead of; forestall b) to precede c) to anticipate 4)… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 20 prevent — verb Etymology: Middle English, to anticipate, from Latin praeventus, past participle of praevenire to come before, anticipate, forestall, from prae + venire to come more at come Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. archaic a. to be in readiness …

    New Collegiate Dictionary