parody

  • 1 parody — I noun amphigory, apery, buffoonery, burlesque, caricature, cartoon, comical representation, distortion, exaggeration, farce, imitation, lampoon, ludicrous imitation, mime, mimicry, mockery, mummery, pasquinade, ridicula imitatio, ridicule,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 parody — par o*dy (p[a^]r [ o]*d[y^]), n.; pl. {Parodies} (p[a^]r [ o]*d[i^]z). [L. parodia, Gr. parw,di a; para beside + w,dh a song: cf. F. parodie. See {Para }, and {Ode}.] [1913 Webster] 1. A writing in which the language or sentiment of an author is… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 parody — par o*dy, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {parodied}; p. pr. & vb. n. {parodying}.] [Cf. F. parodier.] To write a parody upon; to burlesque. [1913 Webster] I have translated, or rather parodied, a poem of Horace. Pope. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 parody# — parody n travesty, *caricature, burlesque Analogous words: skit, squib, lampoon, *libel parody vb travesty, caricature, burlesque (see under CARICATURE n) …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 5 parody — [n] imitation, spoof apology, burlesque, caricature, cartoon, copy, derision, farce, irony, jest, joke, lampoon, mime, mimicry, misrepresentation, mockery, mock heroic*, pastiche, play on*, raillery, rib*, ridicule, roast*, satire, send up*, skit …

    New thesaurus

  • 6 parody — ► NOUN (pl. parodies) 1) an amusingly exaggerated imitation of the style of a writer, artist, or genre. 2) a feeble imitation. ► VERB (parodies, parodied) ▪ produce a parody of. DERIVATIVES paro …

    English terms dictionary

  • 7 parody — [par′ə dē] n. pl. parodies [Fr parodie < L parodia < Gr parōidia, burlesque song < para , beside (see PARA 1) + ōidē, song (see ODE)] 1. a) a literary or musical work imitating the characteristic style of some other work or of a writer… …

    English World dictionary

  • 8 Parody — A parody (pronounced|ˈpɛɹədiː US, [Help:IPA| [ˈpaɹədiː] UK), in contemporary usage, is a work created to mock, comment on, or poke fun at an original work, its subject, or author, by means of humorous or satiric imitation. As the literary… …

    Wikipedia

  • 9 parody — parodiable, adj. /par euh dee/, n., pl. parodies, v., parodied, parodying. n. 1. a humorous or satirical imitation of a serious piece of literature or writing: his hilarious parody of Hamlet s soliloquy. 2. the genre of literary composition… …

    Universalium

  • 10 parody — noun 1 writing/speech/music ADJECTIVE ▪ brilliant, clever ▪ funny, hilarious ▪ cruel ▪ song (esp. AmE) …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 11 parody — par|o|dy1 [ˈpærədi] n plural parodies [Date: 1500 1600; : Latin; Origin: parodia, from Greek, from para ( PARA ) + aidein to sing ] 1.) [U and C] a piece of writing, music etc or an action that copies someone or something in an amusing way parody …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 12 parody — I UK [ˈpærədɪ] / US [ˈperədɪ] noun Word forms parody : singular parody plural parodies 1) [countable/uncountable] literature a literary or musical work that copies a serious work in a humorous way parody of: a witty parody of the Orpheus story 2) …

    English dictionary

  • 13 parody — par|o|dy1 [ perədi ] noun 1. ) count or uncount a literary or musical work that copies a serious work in a humorous way: parody of: a witty parody of the Orpheus story 2. ) count something done so badly that it seems like a parody: parody of: a… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 14 Parody —    Technique by which a composer employs a preexisting composition to create a new one, using its melodic ideas, imitative patterns, harmonic structures, etc. to whatever extent he sees fit. The concept of borrowing music to begin a new piece is… …

    Historical dictionary of sacred music

  • 15 parody — {{11}}parody (n.) 1590s (first recorded use in English is in Ben Jonson), from or in imitation of L. parodia parody, from Gk. paroidia burlesque song or poem, from para beside, parallel to (in this case, mock ) + oide song, ode (see ODE (Cf.… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 16 parody — [[t]pæ̱rədi[/t]] parodies, parodying, parodied 1) N VAR: oft N of n A parody is a humorous piece of writing, drama, or music which imitates the style of a well known person or represents a familiar situation in an exaggerated way. The Scarlet… …

    English dictionary

  • 17 parody — n. 1) to compose a parody 2) a parody of, on * * * [ pærədɪ] on a parody of to compose a parody …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 18 parody — I. noun (plural dies) Etymology: Latin parodia, from Greek parōidia, from para + aidein to sing more at ode Date: 1598 1. a literary or musical work in which the style of an author or work is closely imitated for comic effect or in ridicule 2. a… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 19 parody — 1 noun 1 (C, U) a piece of writing or music that copies a particular well known style in an amusing way (+ on/of): The play is a parody of James Joyce s book Ulysses . 2 (C) something that is so bad that it seems like a very bad copy of another… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 20 parody — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n. take off, imitation, travesty, burlesque. See copy, ridicule. II (Roget s IV) n. Syn. travesty, caricature, burlesque, satire, lampoon, spoof, farce, imitation, mimicry, takeoff, pastiche, copy,… …

    English dictionary for students