obstreperously

  • 1 obstreperously — obstreperous ► ADJECTIVE ▪ noisy and difficult to control. DERIVATIVES obstreperously adverb obstreperousness noun. ORIGIN from Latin obstrepere, from strepere make a noise …

    English terms dictionary

  • 2 obstreperously — adverb in manner that attracts attention obstreperously, he demanded to get service • Syn: ↑loudly, ↑clamorously • Derived from adjective: ↑clamorous (for: ↑clamorously), ↑obstr …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 3 Obstreperously — Obstreperous Ob*strep er*ous, a. [L. obstreperus, from obstrepere to make a noise at; ob (see {Ob }) + strepere to make a noise.] 1. Attended by, or making, a loud and tumultuous noise; clamorous; noisy; vociferous. The obstreperous city.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 obstreperously — adverb see obstreperous …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 5 obstreperously — See obstreperous. * * * …

    Universalium

  • 6 obstreperously — adverb in an obstreperous manner …

    Wiktionary

  • 7 obstreperously — É™b streprÉ™slɪ adv. in an obstreperous manner; loudly, boisterously, unrestrainedly …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 8 obstreperously — ob·strep·er·ous·ly …

    English syllables

  • 9 obstreperous — obstreperously, adv. obstreperousness, obstreperosity /euhb strep euh ros i tee/, n. /euhb strep euhr euhs/, adj. 1. resisting control or restraint in a difficult manner; unruly. 2. noisy, clamorous, or boisterous: obstreperous children. [1590… …

    Universalium

  • 10 clamorously — adverb in manner that attracts attention obstreperously, he demanded to get service • Syn: ↑obstreperously, ↑loudly • Derived from adjective: ↑clamorous, ↑obstreperous (for: ↑obs …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 11 loudly — adverb 1. with relatively high volume (Freq. 10) the band played loudly she spoke loudly and angrily he spoke loud enough for those at the back of the room to hear him cried aloud for help • Syn: ↑loud, ↑aloud …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 12 obstreperous — adjective Etymology: Latin obstreperus, from obstrepere to clamor against, from ob against + strepere to make a noise Date: circa 1600 1. marked by unruly or aggressive noisiness ; clamorous < obstreperous merriment > 2. stubbornly resistant to… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 13 Walter Passmore — Life and careerEarly careerWalter Henry Passmore was born in London and became a choirboy at All Saints Church in Notting Hill. On Christmas morning 1881 he sang in The Messiah , and the following day he made his first professional stage… …

    Wikipedia

  • 14 obstreperousness — See obstreperously. * * * …

    Universalium

  • 15 toper — noun /ˈtəʊpə/ Someone who drinks a lot; a drunkard. The liquor soon mounted into their heads, as it generally does even with the arrantest topers newly landed from sea, and they began capering about most obstreperously …

    Wiktionary

  • 16 loudly — (Roget s IV) modif. Syn. audibly, vociferously, ringingly, fully, powerfully, crashingly, shrilly, deafeningly, piercingly, resonantly, emphatically, vehemently, thunderingly, ear splittingly, in a full toned voice, full sounding, articulately,… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 17 obstreperous — ob|strep|e|rous [əbˈstrepərəs] adj formal [Date: 1500 1600; : Latin; Origin: obstreperus, from obstrepere to shout against ] noisy and refusing to do what someone asks →↑awkward >obstreperously adv …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 18 obstreperous — (adj.) c.1600, from L. obstreperus clamorous, from obstrepere drown with noise, oppose noisily, from ob against (see OB (Cf. ob )) + strepere make a noise, from PIE *strep , said to be imitative (Cf. L. stertare to snore, O.N …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 19 bulling — n Irish behaving aggressively, obstreperously …

    Contemporary slang

  • 20 obstreperous — [əb strɛp(ə)rəs] adjective noisy and difficult to control. Derivatives obstreperously adverb obstreperousness noun Origin C16: from L. obstreperus (from obstrepere, from ob against + strepere make a noise ) + ous …

    English new terms dictionary