meagre

  • 1 meagre — mea‧gre [ˈmiːgə ǁ ər] , meager adjective very small in amount: • Sales rose a meager 2.5% in January. • The chairman predicts very meagre growth this year. * * * meagre UK US UK (US meager) /ˈmiːgər/ adjective …

    Financial and business terms

  • 2 Meagre — Mea gre, n. [F. maigre.] (Zo[ o]l.) A large European sci[ae]noid fish ({Sci[ae]na umbra} or {Sci[ae]na aquila}), having white bloodless flesh. It is valued as a food fish. [Written also {maigre}.] [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 meagre — British English spelling of MEAGER (Cf. meager) (q.v.); for spelling, see RE (Cf. re) …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 4 meagre — is spelt this way in BrE, and usually meager in AmE …

    Modern English usage

  • 5 meagre — (US meager) ► ADJECTIVE 1) lacking in quantity or quality. 2) lean; thin. DERIVATIVES meagreness noun. ORIGIN Old French maigre, from Latin macer …

    English terms dictionary

  • 6 meagre — mea|gre BrE meager AmE [ˈmi:gə US ər] adj [Date: 1300 1400; : French; Origin: maigre, from Latin macer thin ] a meagre amount of food, money etc is too small and is much less than you need ▪ a meagre diet of bread and beans meagre… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 7 Meagre — Meager Mea ger, Meagre Mea gre, a. [OE. merge, F. maigre, L. macer; akin to D. & G. mager, Icel. magr, and prob. to Gr. makro s long. Cf. {Emaciate}, {Maigre}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Destitue of, or having little, flesh; lean. [1913 Webster] Meager… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8 meagre — [[t]mi͟ːgə(r)[/t]] ADJ GRADED (disapproval) If you describe an amount or quantity of something as meagre, you are critical of it because it is very small or not enough. The bank s staff were already angered by a meagre 3.1% pay rise... Their food …

    English dictionary

  • 9 meagre — BrE, meager AmE adjective a meagre amount of food, money etc is too small and is much less than you need: meagre wages | a meager diet meagrely adverb meagreness noun (U) …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 10 Meagre — Meager Mea ger, Meagre Mea gre, v. t. To make lean. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 11 Meagre — Adlerfisch Adlerfisch (Argyrosomus regius) Systematik Teilklasse: Echte Knochenfische (Teleostei) Ordnung …

    Deutsch Wikipedia

  • 12 meagre — 1. noun /ˈmiːɡɚ/ An edible fish of the genus Argyrosomus. 2. adjective /ˈmiːɡɚ/ a) Having little flesh; lean; thin. A meagre piece of cake in one bite. b) Deficient or inferior in amount, quality or extent; …

    Wiktionary

  • 13 meagre — adj. Meagre/meager is used with these nouns: ↑allowance, ↑belongings, ↑earnings, ↑existence, ↑income, ↑living, ↑meal, ↑pension, ↑ration, ↑resource, ↑return, ↑ …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 14 meagre — [14] Meagre originally meant literally ‘thin’ (it goes back via Anglo Norman megre and Old French maigre to Latin macer ‘thin’, source also of English emaciate [17]). Not until the 16th century did the modern figurative sense ‘scanty’ begin to… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 15 meagre — UK [ˈmiːɡə(r)] / US [ˈmɪɡər] adjective smaller or less than you want or need a meagre food supply Derived words: meagrely adverb meagreness noun uncountable …

    English dictionary

  • 16 meagre — [ˈmiːgə] adj smaller or less than you want or need a meagre food supply[/ex] …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • 17 meagre — /ˈmigə / (say meeguh) adjective 1. deficient in quantity or quality, or without fullness or richness. 2. having little flesh, lean, or thin. 3. → maigre. –noun (plural meagre or meagres) 4. a long, thin fish of the genus Sciaena, sometimes found… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 18 meagre — paprastasis sidabrinis kuprys statusas T sritis zoologija | vardynas taksono rangas rūšis atitikmenys: lot. Argyrosomus regius angl. meagre rus. обыкновенный серебристый горбыль ryšiai: platesnis terminas – sidabriniai kupriai …

    Žuvų pavadinimų žodynas

  • 19 meagre — [14] Meagre originally meant literally ‘thin’ (it goes back via Anglo Norman megre and Old French maigre to Latin macer ‘thin’, source also of English emaciate [17]). Not until the 16th century did the modern figurative sense ‘scanty’ begin to… …

    Word origins

  • 20 meagre — adj. (US meager) 1 lacking in amount or quality (a meagre salary). 2 (of literary composition, ideas, etc.) lacking fullness, unsatisfying. 3 (of a person or animal) lean, thin. Derivatives: meagrely adv. meagreness n. Etymology: ME f. AF megre,… …

    Useful english dictionary