make-shift

  • 1 make shift — ► make shift dated manage or contrive to do something. Main Entry: ↑shift …

    English terms dictionary

  • 2 make|shift|y — «MAYK SHIHF tee», adjective. = makeshift. (Cf. ↑makeshift) …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 3 make|shift — «MAYK SHIHFT», noun, adjective. –n. something made to use for a time instead of the right thing; temporary substitute: »When the electric lights went out, we used candles as a makeshift. Spools and buttons were the child s makeshifts for toys.… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 4 make shift — make do, manage to the best of one s ability …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 5 make shift — dated manage or contrive to do something. → shift …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 6 make shift — phrasal to manage with difficulty …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 7 make shift — phrasal : to try to get along or succeed under difficulties or with inferior means * * * do what one wants to do in spite of not having ideal conditions …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 8 make·shift — /ˈmeıkˌʃıft/ adj : used as a usually rough and temporary replacement for something A large box served as a makeshift table …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 9 To make shift — make make, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {made} (m[=a]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {making}.] [OE. maken, makien, AS. macian; akin to OS. mak?n, OFries. makia, D. maken, G. machen, OHG. mahh?n to join, fit, prepare, make, Dan. mage. Cf. {Match} an equal.] 1. To… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 10 To make shift — Shift Shift, n. [Cf. Icel. skipti. See {Shift}, v. t.] 1. The act of shifting. Specifically: (a) The act of putting one thing in the place of another, or of changing the place of a thing; change; substitution. [1913 Webster] My going to Oxford… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 11 shift — shift; shift·abil·i·ty; shift·able; shift·er; shift·ful; shift·i·ly; shift·i·ness; shift·less; shift·man; make·shift; blue·shift·ed; make·shift·ness; shift·less·ly; shift·less·ness; …

    English syllables

  • 12 Shift — Shift, n. [Cf. Icel. skipti. See {Shift}, v. t.] 1. The act of shifting. Specifically: (a) The act of putting one thing in the place of another, or of changing the place of a thing; change; substitution. [1913 Webster] My going to Oxford was not… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 13 shift — ► VERB 1) move or change from one position to another. 2) Brit. informal move quickly. 3) (shift oneself) Brit. informal move or rouse oneself. 4) Brit. remove (a stain). 5) informal sell (goods) quickly or in large quantities. 6) …

    English terms dictionary

  • 14 make — make, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {made} (m[=a]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {making}.] [OE. maken, makien, AS. macian; akin to OS. mak?n, OFries. makia, D. maken, G. machen, OHG. mahh?n to join, fit, prepare, make, Dan. mage. Cf. {Match} an equal.] 1. To cause to …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 15 make — make; make·bate; make·ham s; make·less; trans·make; un·make; make·shift; re·make; make·shift·ness; make·shifty; …

    English syllables

  • 16 shift — [shift] vt. [ME schiften < OE sciftan, to divide, separate < IE * skeib > SHIP] 1. to move or transfer from one person, place, or position to another [to shift the blame] 2. to replace by another or others; change or exchange 3. to… …

    English World dictionary

  • 17 Make — (m[=a]k), v. i. 1. To act in a certain manner; to have to do; to manage; to interfere; to be active; often in the phrase to meddle or make. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] A scurvy, jack a nape priest to meddle or make. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To proceed;… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 18 shift — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) v. veer, vary, change; equivocate; contrive, get along; transfer; substitute. n. change, substitution, dislocation; expedient, subterfuge, trick. See deviation, cunning. II (Roget s IV) n. 1. [A change]… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 19 shift — {{11}}shift (n.1) c.1300, a movement, a beginning, from SHIFT (Cf. shift) (v.). This is the sense in to make shift make efforts (mid 15c.). Meaning period of working time (originally in a mine) is attested from 1809, perhaps influenced by a N.Sea …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 20 make — v. & n. v. (past and past part. made) 1 tr. construct; create; form from parts or other substances (made a table; made it out of cardboard; made him a sweater). 2 tr. (foll. by to + infin.) cause or compel (a person etc.) to do something (make… …

    Useful english dictionary