leap over

  • 1 Leap Frog (board game) — Leap Frog is a two player abstract strategy game. It can actually be played by several players at once. The game is an old classic, and may have derived from Solitaire and draughts. It is essentially a multi player version of Solitaire. A square… …

    Wikipedia

  • 2 leap — I n. 1) a quantum leap 2) a leap forward II v. 1) (d; intr.) to leap at ( to be eager for ) (to leap at an opportunity) 2) (d; intr.) to leap out of (the dolphin leaped out of the water) 3) (d; intr.) to leap over (to leap over a fence) 4)… …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 3 leap — leaper, n. /leep/, v., leaped or leapt, leaping, n. v.i. 1. to spring through the air from one point or position to another; jump: to leap over a ditch. 2. to move or act quickly or suddenly: to leap aside; She leaped at the opportunity. 3. to… …

    Universalium

  • 4 leap — [c]/lip / (say leep) verb (leapt /lɛpt/ (say lept) or leaped, leaping) –verb (i) 1. to spring through the air from one point or position to another: to leap over a ditch. 2. to move quickly and lightly: to leap aside. 3. to pass, come, rise, etc …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 5 leap — [[t]lip[/t]] v. leaped or leapt [[t]lɛpt, lipt[/t]] leap•ing, 1) to spring through the air from one point or position to another; jump: to leap over a ditch[/ex] 2) to move or act quickly or suddenly: to leap aside; to leap at an opportunity[/ex] …

    From formal English to slang

  • 6 leap — 01. The frog [leapt] from the little boy s hand into the pond. 02. The children [leapt] into the air, and cheered to celebrate the end of the last day of school. 03. The swimmers [leapt] off the cliff, and plunged 15 feet into the lake below. 04 …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 7 leap — I. verb (leaped or leapt; leaping) Etymology: Middle English lepen, from Old English hlēapan; akin to Old High German hlouffan to run Date: before 12th century intransitive verb 1. to spring free from or as if from the ground ; jump …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 8 over — /oh veuhr/, prep. 1. above in place or position: the roof over one s head. 2. above and to the other side of: to leap over a wall. 3. above in authority, rank, power, etc., so as to govern, control, or have jurisdiction regarding: There is no one …

    Universalium

  • 9 over — o•ver [[t]ˈoʊ vər[/t]] prep. 1) above in place or position: the roof over one s head[/ex] 2) above and to the other side of: to leap over a wall[/ex] 3) above in authority, rank, power, etc.: no one over her in the department[/ex] 4) so as to… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 10 over — /ˈoʊvə / (say ohvuh) preposition 1. above in place or position; higher up than: the roof over one s head. 2. above and to the other side of: to leap over a wall. 3. above in authority, power, etc.; so as to govern, control, or conquer. 4. on or… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 11 leap — Synonyms and related words: accept, access, accession, accretion, accrual, accruement, accumulation, addition, advance, aggrandizement, amount, amplification, anabasis, appreciation, ascension, ascent, augmentation, avant propos, ballooning,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 12 over — I. adverb Etymology: Middle English, adverb & preposition, from Old English ofer; akin to Old High German ubar (preposition) above, beyond, over, Latin super, Greek hyper Date: before 12th century 1. a. across a barrier or intervening space;… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 13 leap — [lēp] vi. leapt [lept, lēpt] or leaped, leaping [ME lepen < OE hleapan, akin to MDu lopen, Ger laufen] 1. to move oneself suddenly from the ground, etc. by using one s leg muscles; jump; spring 2. to move suddenly or swiftly, as if by jumping; …

    English World dictionary

  • 14 leap|frog — «LEEP FROG, FRG», noun, verb, frogged, frog|ging. –n. 1. a game in which players take turns jumping over the others who are bending over. 2. Military. a method of advancing against an enemy in which the most forward unit provides protective fire… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 15 Leap — Leap, v. t. 1. To pass over by a leap or jump; as, to leap a wall, or a ditch. [1913 Webster] 2. To copulate with (a female beast); to cover. [1913 Webster] 3. To cause to leap; as, to leap a horse across a ditch. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 16 Leap year — Bissextile; a year containing 366 days; every fourth year which leaps over a day more than a common year, giving to February twenty nine days. See {Bissextile}. [1913 Webster] Note: Every year whose number is divisible by four without a remainde …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 17 Leap — (l[=e]p), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Leaped} (l[=e]pt; 277), rarely {Leapt} (l[=e]pt or l[e^]pt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Leaping}.] [OE. lepen, leapen, AS. hle[ a]pan to leap, jump, run; akin to OS. [=a]hl[=o]pan, OFries. hlapa, D. loopen, G. laufen, OHG.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 18 leap — [n] jump; increase bound, caper, escalation, frisk, hop, rise, skip, spring, surge, upsurge, upswing, vault; concepts 194,780 leap [v] jump, jump over; increase advance, arise, ascend, bounce, bound, caper, cavort, clear, escalate, frisk, hop,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 19 Over the Next Hill — Studio album by Fairport Convention Released 2004 Recorded …

    Wikipedia

  • 20 Leap into Darkness — is a memoir that was written by Leo Bretholz. The book was published in 1999, and was co written by Michael Olesker. Plot SummaryThe book begins with Hitler s entry into Austria in 1938. The book recounts Leo s early life and the beginning of the …

    Wikipedia