invoke

  • 1 invoke — in‧voke [ɪnˈvəʊk ǁ ˈvoʊk] verb [transitive] LAW to use a law, principle etc to support a view or decision: • The seller of the goods invoked an exclusion clause in the guarantee. * * * invoke UK US /ɪnˈvəʊk/ verb [T] FORMAL ► …

    Financial and business terms

  • 2 Invoke — In*voke , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Invoked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Invoking}.] [F. invoquer, L. invocare; pref. in in, on + vocare to call, fr. vox voice. See {Voice}, and cf. {Invocate}.] To call on for aid or protection; to invite earnestly or solemnly; …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 invoke — in·voke /in vōk/ vt in·voked, in·vok·ing 1: to appeal to as furnishing authority or motive 2: to put into legal effect or call for the observance of: enforce invoking his Fifth Amendment privilege …

    Law dictionary

  • 4 invoke — [in vōk′] vt. invoked, invoking [ME invoken < MFr invoquer < L invocare < in , in, on + vocare, to call < vox, VOICE] 1. to call on (God, a god, a saint, the Muses, etc.) for blessing, help, inspiration, support, etc. 2. to resort to… …

    English World dictionary

  • 5 invoke — [v1] call upon adjure, appeal to, beg, beseech, call forth, conjure, crave, entreat, implore, importune, petition, plead, pray, request, send for, solicit, summon, supplicate; concept 48 invoke [v2] put into effect apply, call in, effect, enforce …

    New thesaurus

  • 6 invoke —   [engl.], aufrufen …

    Universal-Lexikon

  • 7 invoke — (v.) late 15c., from M.Fr. envoquer (12c.), from L. invocare call upon, implore, from in upon (see IN (Cf. in ) (2)) + vocare to call, related to vox (gen. vocis) voice (see VOICE (Cf. voice)). Related …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 8 invoke — ► VERB 1) appeal to as an authority or in support of an argument. 2) call on (a deity or spirit) in prayer or as a witness. 3) call earnestly for. 4) summon (a spirit) by charms or incantation. 5) give rise to; evoke. DERIVATIVES invoker noun …

    English terms dictionary

  • 9 invoke — 01. The priest [invoked] a blessing for the sick child. 02. Too many people [invoke] a passage of the Bible to justify their intolerance of those who are different. 03. The old witch [invoked] the help of evil spirits to destroy her enemy. 04. By …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 10 invoke — invocable, adj. invoker, n. /in vohk /, v.t., invoked, invoking. 1. to call for with earnest desire; make supplication or pray for: to invoke God s mercy. 2. to call on (a deity, Muse, etc.), as in prayer or supplication. 3. to declare to be… …

    Universalium

  • 11 invoke — UK [ɪnˈvəʊk] / US [ɪnˈvoʊk] verb [transitive] Word forms invoke : present tense I/you/we/they invoke he/she/it invokes present participle invoking past tense invoked past participle invoked formal 1) to use a law or rule in order to achieve… …

    English dictionary

  • 12 invoke — in|voke [ınˈvəuk US ˈvouk] v [T] formal [Date: 1400 1500; : French; Origin: invoquer, from Latin invocare, from vocare to call ] 1.) if you invoke a law, rule etc, you say that you are doing something because the law allows or forces you to ▪ The …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 13 invoke — [[t]ɪnvo͟ʊk[/t]] invokes, invoking, invoked 1) VERB If you invoke a law, you state that you are taking a particular action because that law allows or tells you to. [V n] The judge invoked an international law that protects refugees. 2) VERB If… …

    English dictionary

  • 14 invoke — in•voke [[t]ɪnˈvoʊk[/t]] v. t. voked, vok•ing 1) to call for with earnest desire; make supplication or pray for: to invoke God s mercy[/ex] 2) to call on (a deity, Muse, etc.), as in prayer or supplication 3) to declare to be binding or in effect …

    From formal English to slang

  • 15 invoke — verb Invoke is used with these nouns as the object: ↑authority, ↑clause, ↑deity, ↑doctrine, ↑ghost, ↑memory, ↑metaphor, ↑name, ↑principle, ↑spectre, ↑spirit …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 16 invoke — in|voke [ ın vouk ] verb transitive FORMAL 1. ) to use a law or rule in order to achieve something: The president invoked the Taft Hartley law to force the strikers to return to work. In extreme situations, the police chief may invoke emergency… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 17 invoke — verb (T) formal 1 to use a law, principle, or theory to support your views: Such legislation has frequently been invoked to silence political opposition. 2 to make a particular idea, image or feeling appear in people s minds: His earlier novels… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 18 invoke — /ɪnˈvoʊk / (say in vohk) verb (t) (invoked, invoking) 1. to call for with earnest desire; make supplication or prayer for: to invoke God s mercy. 2. to call on (a divine being, etc.), as in prayer. 3. to appeal to, as for confirmation: *He… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 19 invoke — transitive verb (invoked; invoking) Etymology: Middle English envoken, from Middle French invoquer, from Latin invocare, from in + vocare to call, from voc , vox voice more at voice Date: 15th century 1. a. to petition for help or support b. to… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 20 invoke — verb /ɪnˈvoʊk/ a) To call upon (a person, especially a god) for help, assistance or guidance. In certain Christian circles invoking the Bible equals irrefutable proof b) To appeal for validation to a (notably cited) authority …

    Wiktionary