inhering or inherent

  • 1 Inhering — Inhere In*here , v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Inhered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Inhering}.] [L. inhaerere; pref. in in + haerere to stick, hang. See {Hesitate}.] To be inherent; to stick (in); to be fixed in or permanently incorporated with something; to cleave …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 inherent — inherently, adv. /in hear euhnt, her /, adj. 1. existing in someone or something as a permanent and inseparable element, quality, or attribute: an inherent distrust of strangers. 2. Gram. standing before a noun. 3. inhering; infixed. [1570 80; <… …

    Universalium

  • 3 inherent — adj 1. inborn, inbred, innate, ingenerate; immanent, indwelling, inherent, indigenous, intrinsic; permanent, inseparable, built in. 2. native, natural, natural born; congenital, hereditary, inherited, in the blood, in the family; ingrained,… …

    A Note on the Style of the synonym finder

  • 4 attributable — a. 1. Ascribable, imputable, referrible, chargeable, traceable, owing, due, to be charged, to be attributed, to be imputed. 2. Predicable, ascribable, belonging, adhering, inhering or inherent (in), true (of) …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 5 Hegel, spirit, and politics — Leo Rauch Hegel’s impact on political thought has been immense giving shape to the major political movements of the modern world. Yet the person of average education is hardly familiar with the name, which is usually identified with a small… …

    History of philosophy

  • 6 Sanctifying Grace — • Treatise on this fundamental building block of Christianity Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Sanctifying Grace     Sanctifying Grace      …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 7 Locke’s political theory — Ian Harris The author of Two Treatises of Government also wrote An Essay concerning Human Understanding. This is an elementary fact, but one with an important implication for understanding Locke’s political theory. For Two Treatises is an… …

    History of philosophy

  • 8 PHILOSOPHY, JEWISH — This article is arranged according to the following outline: WHAT IS JEWISH PHILOSOPHY? recent histories of jewish philosophy biblical and rabbinic antecedents bible rabbinic literature hellenistic jewish philosophy philo of alexandria biblical… …

    Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • 9 Article One of the United States Constitution — United States of America This article is part of the series: United States Constitution Original text of the Constitution Preamble Articles of the Constitution I  …

    Wikipedia

  • 10 inherence — /in hear euhns, her /, n. 1. the state or fact of inhering or being inherent. 2. Philos. the relation of an attribute to its subject. [1570 80; < ML inhaerentia. See INHERENT, ENCE] * * * …

    Universalium

  • 11 Whewell’s philosophy of science and ethics — Struan Jacobs ON SCIENCE Introduction Among the most prodigious of English minds of the nineteenth century, William Whewell (1794–1866) was at various times, and among other things, philosopher, intellectual historian, scientist, educationist,… …

    History of philosophy

  • 12 inhere — (v.) 1580s, to exist, have being, from L. inhaerere to stick in or to (see INHERENT (Cf. inherent)). Figurative (immaterial) use attested by 1610s (also in Latin). Related: Inhered; inhering …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 13 Inhere — In*here , v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Inhered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Inhering}.] [L. inhaerere; pref. in in + haerere to stick, hang. See {Hesitate}.] To be inherent; to stick (in); to be fixed in or permanently incorporated with something; to cleave (to);… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 14 Inhered — Inhere In*here , v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Inhered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Inhering}.] [L. inhaerere; pref. in in + haerere to stick, hang. See {Hesitate}.] To be inherent; to stick (in); to be fixed in or permanently incorporated with something; to cleave …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 15 inhere — intransitive verb (inhered; inhering) Etymology: Middle English enheren to be a companion, belong, from Latin inhaerēre to be attached, from in + haerēre to adhere Date: 15th century to be inherent < does selfishness inhere in each of us? > …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 16 inhere — /in hear /, v.i., inhered, inhering. to exist permanently and inseparably in, as a quality, attribute, or element; belong intrinsically; be inherent: the advantages that inhere in a democratic system. [1580 90; < L inhaerere, equiv. to in IN 2 +… …

    Universalium

  • 17 rhetoric — /ret euhr ik/, n. 1. (in writing or speech) the undue use of exaggeration or display; bombast. 2. the art or science of all specialized literary uses of language in prose or verse, including the figures of speech. 3. the study of the effective… …

    Universalium

  • 18 Roman Catholicism — the faith, practice, and system of government of the Roman Catholic Church. [1815 25] * * * Largest single Christian denomination in the world, with some one billion members, or about 18% of the world s population. The Roman Catholic church has… …

    Universalium

  • 19 organized labour — Introduction also called  trade unionism,        association and activities of workers in a trade or industry for the purpose of obtaining or assuring improvements in working conditions through their collective action. Great Britain (United… …

    Universalium

  • 20 Leibniz (from) to Kant — From Leibniz to Kant Lewis White Beck INTRODUCTION Had Kant not lived, German philosophy between the death of Leibniz in 1716 and the end of the eighteenth century would have little interest for us, and would remain largely unknown. In Germany… …

    History of philosophy