inflict

  • 1 Inflict — In*flict , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Inflicted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Inflicting}.] [L. inflictus, p. p. of infligere to strike on, to inflict; pref. in in, on + fligere to strike. Cf. {Flail}.] To give, cause, or produce by striking, or as if by… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 inflict — I verb administer a penalty, administer punishment, agitate, agonize, apply, beset, bring about, bring upon, burden, cause, cause to suffer, coerce, commit, deal, disquiet, distress, enforce, force, force upon, give pain, harass, harm, hurt,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 3 inflict — (v.) 1560s, from L. inflictus, pp. of infligere to strike or dash against, from in on, against (see IN (Cf. in ) (2)) + fligere (pp. flictus) to dash, strike (see AFFLICT (Cf. afflict)). You inflict trouble on someone; you af …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 4 inflict — inflict, afflict Both words are concerned with the suffering of unpleasant circumstances, but they have different constructions. Inflict has the unpleasantness as object, and afflict has the victim: • He knew also that the greater part of the… …

    Modern English usage

  • 5 inflict — ► VERB (inflict on) 1) cause (something unpleasant or painful) to be suffered by. 2) impose (something unwelcome) on. DERIVATIVES infliction noun. ORIGIN Latin infligere strike against …

    English terms dictionary

  • 6 inflict — [v] impose something administer, apply, bring upon, command, deal out, deliver, dispense, exact, expose, extort, force, force upon, give, give it to*, lay down the law*, levy, mete out, require, stick it to*, strike, subject, visit, wreak;… …

    New thesaurus

  • 7 inflict — [in flikt′] vt. [< L inflictus, pp. of infligere, to strike or beat against < in , on, against + fligere, to strike < IE base * bhlīg̑ , to strike > Welsh blif, catapult] 1. to give or cause (pain, wounds, etc.) by or as by striking;… …

    English World dictionary

  • 8 inflict — 01. Our army has [inflicted] heavy casualties on the enemy. 02. She thinks that hunters should be forbidden from [inflicting] suffering upon animals for sport. 03. When parrots are caged for a long time, the boredom can drive them crazy, with the …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 9 inflict — UK [ɪnˈflɪkt] / US verb [transitive] Word forms inflict : present tense I/you/we/they inflict he/she/it inflicts present participle inflicting past tense inflicted past participle inflicted to cause something unpleasant to happen Such a policy… …

    English dictionary

  • 10 inflict — v. (D; tr.) to inflict on (to inflict heavy losses on the enemy) * * * [ɪn flɪkt] (D;tr.) to inflict on (to inflict heavy losses on the enemy) …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 11 inflict — in|flict [ınˈflıkt] v [Date: 1500 1600; : Latin; Origin: , past participle of infligere, from fligere to hit ] 1.) [T] to make someone suffer something unpleasant inflict sth on/upon sb ▪ The strikes inflicted serious damage on the economy. ▪… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 12 inflict — in|flict [ ın flıkt ] verb transitive to cause something unpleasant to happen: Such a policy would inflict severe hardship and suffering. inflict something on someone/something: the environmental damage we are inflicting on the Earth inflict… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 13 inflict — transitive verb Etymology: Latin inflictus, past participle of infligere, from in + fligere to strike more at profligate Date: 1566 1. afflict 2. a. to give by or as if by striking < inflict pain > b. to cause (something unpleasant) to be endured …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 14 inflict — Synonyms and related words: accomplish, achieve, administer, afflict, apply, bring, bring about, bring off, bring to pass, bring upon, burden with, charge, commit, deal, deliver, demand, do, do to, effect, effectuate, enjoin, exact, expose,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 15 inflict — verb (often inflict something on) cause (something unpleasant or painful) to be suffered by someone else. Derivatives inflictable adjective inflicter (also inflictor) noun infliction noun Origin C16 (in the sense afflict, trouble ): from L.… …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 16 inflict — verb 1 (T) to make someone suffer something unpleasant: The judge inflicted the severest possible penalty. | inflict sth on/upon sb: He inflicted a great deal of suffering on his wife and children. 2 inflict yourself on humorous to visit or be… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 17 inflict — in•flict [[t]ɪnˈflɪkt[/t]] v. t. 1) to impose as something that must be borne or suffered: to inflict punishment[/ex] 2) to impose (anything unwelcome): to inflict a long visit on someone[/ex] 3) to deal or deliver, as a blow • Etymology:… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 18 inflict — /ɪnˈflɪkt / (say in flikt) verb (t) 1. to lay on: to inflict a dozen lashes. 2. to impose as something that must be borne or suffered: to inflict punishment. 3. to impose (anything unwelcome). {Latin inflictus, past participle, struck against}… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 19 inflict — v.tr. (usu. foll. by on, upon) 1 administer, deal (a stroke, wound, defeat, etc.). 2 (also refl.) often joc. impose (suffering, a penalty, oneself, one s company, etc.) on (shall not inflict myself on you any longer). Derivatives: inflictable adj …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 20 inflict — inflictable, adj. inflicter, inflictor, n. inflictive, adj. /in flikt /, v.t. 1. to impose as something that must be borne or suffered: to inflict punishment. 2. to impose (anything unwelcome): The regime inflicted burdensome taxes on the people …

    Universalium