incapable of further analysis

  • 1 Analysis — • The process by which anything complex is resolved into simple, or at least less complex parts or elements Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Analysis     Analysis      …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 2 Ultimate analysis — Ultimate Ul ti*mate, a. [LL. ultimatus last, extreme, fr. L. ultimare to come to an end, fr. ultimus the farthest, last, superl. from the same source as ulterior. See {Ulterior}, and cf. {Ultimatum}.] 1. Farthest; most remote in space or time;… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 Requirements analysis — in systems engineering and software engineering, encompasses those tasks that go into determining the needs or conditions to meet for a new or altered product, taking account of the possibly conflicting requirements of the various stakeholders,… …

    Wikipedia

  • 4 Smooth infinitesimal analysis — is a mathematically rigorous reformulation of the calculus in terms of infinitesimals. Based on the ideas of F. W. Lawvere and employing the methods of category theory, it views all functions as being continuous and incapable of being expressed… …

    Wikipedia

  • 5 Ultimate — Ul ti*mate, a. [LL. ultimatus last, extreme, fr. L. ultimare to come to an end, fr. ultimus the farthest, last, superl. from the same source as ulterior. See {Ulterior}, and cf. {Ultimatum}.] 1. Farthest; most remote in space or time; extreme;… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 Ultimate belief — Ultimate Ul ti*mate, a. [LL. ultimatus last, extreme, fr. L. ultimare to come to an end, fr. ultimus the farthest, last, superl. from the same source as ulterior. See {Ulterior}, and cf. {Ultimatum}.] 1. Farthest; most remote in space or time;… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 Ultimate ratio — Ultimate Ul ti*mate, a. [LL. ultimatus last, extreme, fr. L. ultimare to come to an end, fr. ultimus the farthest, last, superl. from the same source as ulterior. See {Ulterior}, and cf. {Ultimatum}.] 1. Farthest; most remote in space or time;… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8 ultimate — I. adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin ultimatus last, final, from Late Latin, past participle of ultimare to come to an end, be last, from Latin ultimus farthest, last, final, superlative of Latin *ulter situated beyond Date: 1640 1. a. most… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 9 ultimate — I. a. 1. Last, final, farthest, extreme, eventual, most remote. 2. Constituent, incapable of further analysis. II. v. a., v. n. 1. Eventuate, end, terminate, issue, conclude. 2. Bring into use, carry into practice …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 10 United States — a republic in the N Western Hemisphere comprising 48 conterminous states, the District of Columbia, and Alaska in North America, and Hawaii in the N Pacific. 267,954,767; conterminous United States, 3,022,387 sq. mi. (7,827,982 sq. km); with… …

    Universalium

  • 11 Spain — /spayn/, n. a kingdom in SW Europe. Including the Balearic and Canary islands, 39,244,195; 194,988 sq. mi. (505,019 sq. km). Cap.: Madrid. Spanish, España. * * * Spain Introduction Spain Background: Spain s powerful world empire of the 16th and… …

    Universalium

  • 12 philosophy, Western — Introduction       history of Western philosophy from its development among the ancient Greeks to the present.       This article has three basic purposes: (1) to provide an overview of the history of philosophy in the West, (2) to relate… …

    Universalium

  • 13 Descartes: metaphysics and the philosophy of mind — John Cottingham THE CARTESIAN PROJECT Descartes is rightly regarded as one of the inaugurators of the modern age, and there is no doubt that his thought profoundly altered the course of Western philosophy. In no area has this influence been more… …

    History of philosophy

  • 14 Mathematics and Physical Sciences — ▪ 2003 Introduction Mathematics       Mathematics in 2002 was marked by two discoveries in number theory. The first may have practical implications; the second satisfied a 150 year old curiosity.       Computer scientist Manindra Agrawal of the… …

    Universalium

  • 15 Info-gap decision theory — is a non probabilistic decision theory that seeks to optimize robustness to failure – or opportuneness for windfall – under severe uncertainty,[1][2] in particular applying sensitivity analysis of the stability radius type[3] to perturbations in… …

    Wikipedia

  • 16 Migration — • The movement of populations from place to place Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Migration     Migration     † …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 17 Slavery in the United States — began soon after English colonists first settled Virginia in 1607 and lasted until the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution in 1865. Before the widespread establishment of chattel slavery, much labor was organized …

    Wikipedia

  • 18 British moralists of the eighteenth century: Shaftesbury, Butler and Price — David McNaughton In this chapter I discuss the moral theories of three influential writers: Anthony Ashley Cooper, Third Earl of Shaftesbury (1671–1713); Joseph Butler (1692–1752) and Richard Price (1723–91). All three wrote extensively on issues …

    History of philosophy

  • 19 The Last Puritan — The Last Puritan: A Memoir in the Form of a Novel was written by the American philosopher George Santayana. The novel is set largely in the fictional town of Great Falls, Connecticut; Boston; and England, in and around Oxford. It relates the life …

    Wikipedia

  • 20 Wolf hunting — is the practice of hunting grey wolves (Canis lupus) or other lupine animals. Wolves are mainly hunted for sport, for their skins, to protect livestock, and in some rare cases to protect humans. Wolves have been actively hunted since 12,000 to 13 …

    Wikipedia