in a strict sense

  • 1 strict-sense stationary — adjective Of a random process , having characteristics that do not change as varies …

    Wiktionary

  • 2 in the strict sense — according to the most limited and exact meaning of a word or idea. “Conservative” in the strict sense of the word is not a label that fits her. The novel is not tragic in the strictest sense, but it is certainly full of sadness. Usage notes:… …

    New idioms dictionary

  • 3 A Diary In The Strict Sense Of The Term — A Diary in the Strict Sense of the Term, en français Journal d ethnographe est un livre de Bronislaw Malinowski. Le préface est de Valetta Malinowska, sa femme, l introduction de Raymond Firth. Il a été traduit du polonais à l anglais par Norbert …

    Wikipédia en Français

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  • 5 A Diary in the Strict Sense of the Term — A Diary in the Strict Sense of the Term, en français Journal d ethnographe est un livre de Bronislaw Malinowski. Le préface est de Valetta Malinowska, sa femme, l introduction de Raymond Firth. Il a été traduit du polonais à l anglais par Norbert …

    Wikipédia en Français

  • 6 Strict constructionism — refers to a particular legal philosophy of judicial interpretation that limits or restricts judicial interpretation. In the United States the phrase is also commonly used more loosely as a generic term for conservativism among the judiciary.… …

    Wikipedia

  • 7 Strict — Strict, a. [Compar. {Stricter}; superl. {Strictest}.] [L. strictus, p. p. of stringere to draw or bind tight, to strain. See {Strain}, and cf. {Strait}, a.] 1. Strained; drawn close; tight; as, a strict embrace; a strict ligature. Dryden. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8 strict — [ strıkt ] adjective ** 1. ) someone who is strict has definite rules that they expect people to obey completely: He s quite a strict coach, but we all like him. Dad s very strict with us about table manners. a ) strict rules or conditions must… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 9 sense — I n. judgment 1) to display, show sense 2) common, good, horse (colloq.) sense 3) a grain of sense 4) the sense to + inf. (they don t have the sense to admit defeat) 5) (misc.) to bring smb. to her/his senses; to come to one s senses; to take… …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 10 strict */*/ — UK [strɪkt] / US adjective Word forms strict : adjective strict comparative stricter superlative strictest 1) someone who is strict has definite rules that they expect people to obey completely He s quite a strict trainer, but we all like him.… …

    English dictionary

  • 11 strict — [[t]strɪkt[/t]] adj. er, est 1) closely conforming to requirements or principles: a strict observance of rituals[/ex] 2) stringent; exacting: strict laws; a strict judge[/ex] 3) rigorously enforced: strict silence[/ex] 4) exact; precise: in the… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 12 strict*/ — [strɪkt] adj 1) someone who is strict expects people to obey rules completely, or obeys rules completely themselves The coach is very strict about our diet.[/ex] 2) strict rules or conditions must be obeyed completely They operate within strict… …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • 13 strict — adjective Etymology: Middle English stricte, from Latin strictus, from past participle of stringere to bind tight more at strain Date: 15th century 1. archaic a. tight, close; also intimate b. narrow 2 …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 14 strict — S3 [strıkt] adj comparative stricter superlative strictest [Date: 1400 1500; : Latin; Origin: strictus, past participle of stringere; STRINGENT] 1.) expecting people to obey rules or to do what you say ≠ ↑lenient ▪ a strict teacher stri …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 15 strict — (adj.) 1590s, narrow, drawn in, small, from L. strictus drawn together, tight, rigid, pp. of stringere draw or bind tight (see STRAIN (Cf. strain) (v.)). The sense of stringent and rigorous (of law) is first found in 1570s; of qualities or… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 16 Strict — In mathematical writing, the adjective strict is used to modify technical terms which have multiple meanings. It indicates that the exclusive meaning of the term is to be understood. (More formally, one could say that this is the meaning which… …

    Wikipedia

  • 17 strict — [[t]strɪ̱kt[/t]] ♦♦♦ stricter, strictest 1) ADJ GRADED A strict rule or order is very clear and precise or severe and must always be obeyed completely. The officials had issued strict instructions that we were not to get out of the jeep... French …

    English dictionary

  • 18 sense — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun 1 sight, hearing, etc. ADJECTIVE ▪ acute, developed, good, keen ▪ Raccoons have a highly developed sense of touch. ▪ poor ▪ …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 19 sense — I UK [sens] / US noun Word forms sense : singular sense plural senses *** 1) [singular] a strong feeling or belief about yourself sense of: Winning an award would give me a great sense of achievement. They say they are dealing with the problem,… …

    English dictionary

  • 20 strict — [16] Strict was acquired direct from strictus, the past participle of Latin stringere ‘pull tight, tighten’ (source also of English prestige, strain, and stringent). The original literal sense ‘tight’ survived into English (‘She wildly breaketh… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins