give credence to

  • 1 give credence to — index trust Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 give credence to — {v. phr.} 1. To be willing to believe that something is true. * /Larry gave credence to the rumor that Fred used to be a convict./ * /Give no credence to the rumor that our state is bankrupt; nothing could be farther from the truth./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 3 give credence to — {v. phr.} 1. To be willing to believe that something is true. * /Larry gave credence to the rumor that Fred used to be a convict./ * /Give no credence to the rumor that our state is bankrupt; nothing could be farther from the truth./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 4 give\ credence\ to — v. phr. 1. To be willing to believe that something is true. Larry gave credence to the rumor that Fred used to be a convict. Give no credence to the rumor that our state is bankrupt; nothing could be farther from the truth …

    Словарь американских идиом

  • 5 give credence to — accept as true …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 6 give credence to something — to believe that something is true It was too silly an idea for Chrissy to give any credence to it …

    English dictionary

  • 7

  • 8 credence — credence, credit, credibility 1. In general use, credence means ‘belief, trustful acceptance’, and is used mainly in the expression to give (or lend) credence to, which means ‘believe, trust’: • The radicality of these changes…had lent credence… …

    Modern English usage

  • 9 Credence — Cre dence (kr[=e] dens), n. [LL. credentia, fr. L. credens, entis, p. pr. of credere to trust, believe: cf. OF. credence. See {Creed}, and cf. {Credent}, {Creance}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Reliance of the mind on evidence of facts derived from other… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 10 credence — [krēd′ ns] n. [OFr < ML credentia < L credens, prp. of credere: see CREED] 1. belief, esp. in the reports or testimony of another [to give credence to rumors] 2. credentials: now only in the phrase LETTERS OF CREDENCE 3. Eccles. a small… …

    English World dictionary

  • 11 Credence — Cre dence, v. t. To give credence to; to believe. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] || …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 12 credence — cre|dence [ˈkri:dəns] n [U] [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: Medieval Latin credentia, from Latin credere to believe, trust, give to someone to keep safe ] formal the acceptance of something as true give credence to sth (=to believe or… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 13 credence — cre|dence [ kridns ] noun give/lend/add credence to something FORMAL to make people think that something is likely to be true: The recent discovery of the largest meteorite crater in Europe gives credence to Solomon s theory. gain credence if an… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 14 credence — noun (U) formal the acceptance of something as true: The amount of credence accorded to written records will undoubtedly vary. | gain credence (=to become more widely accepted or believed): This doctrine gained credence in academic circles over… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 15 credence — UK [ˈkriːd(ə)ns] / US [ˈkrɪd(ə)ns] noun give/lend/add credence to something formal to make people think that something is likely to be true The recent discovery of the largest meteorite crater in Europe gives credence to Prof Solomon s theory.… …

    English dictionary

  • 16 credence — /kreed ns/, n. 1. belief as to the truth of something: to give credence to a claim. 2. something giving a claim to belief or confidence: letter of credence. 3. Also called credence table, credenza. Eccles. a small side table, shelf, or niche for… …

    Universalium

  • 17 credence — [[t]kri͟ːd(ə)ns[/t]] 1) N UNCOUNT If something lends or gives credence to a theory or story, it makes it easier to believe. [FORMAL] Good studies are needed to lend credence to the notion that genuine progress can be made in this important field …

    English dictionary

  • 18 credence — noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French or Medieval Latin; Anglo French, from Medieval Latin credentia, from Latin credent , credens, present participle of credere to believe, trust more at creed Date: 14th century 1. a. mental… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 19 credence — /ˈkridns / (say kreedns) noun 1. belief: to give credence to a statement. 2. something giving a claim to belief or confidence: letter of credence. 3. Also, credence table. a small side table, shelf, or niche for holding articles used in the… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 20 credence — n. 1 belief. 2 (in full credence table) a small side table, shelf, or niche which holds the elements of the Eucharist before they are consecrated. Phrases and idioms: give credence to believe. letter of credence a letter of introduction, esp. of… …

    Useful english dictionary