emancipate

  • 1 Emancipate — E*man ci*pate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Emancipated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Emancipating}.] [L. emancipatus, p. p. of emancipare to emancipate; e + mancipare to transfer ownership in, fr. manceps purchaser, as being one who laid his hand on the thing… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 emancipate — eman·ci·pate /i man sə ˌpāt/ vt pat·ed, pat·ing 1: to free from restraint, control, or the power of another; esp: to free from bondage emancipated the slaves compare enfranchise 2: to release from the care, r …

    Law dictionary

  • 3 Emancipate — E*man ci*pate, a. [L. emancipatus, p. p.] Set at liberty. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 emancipate — (v.) 1620s, from L. emancipatus, pp. of emancipare declare (someone) free, give up one s authority over, in Roman law, the freeing of a son or wife from the legal authority (patria potestas) of the pater familias, to make his or her own way in… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 5 emancipate — manumit, enfranchise, *free, liberate, release, deliver, discharge …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 6 emancipate — [v] set free affranchise, deliver, discharge, disencumber, disenthral, enfranchise, liberate, loose, loosen, manumit, release, unbind, unchain, unfetter, unshackle; concept 127 Ant. hold, imprison, incarcerate …

    New thesaurus

  • 7 emancipate — ► VERB 1) set free, especially from legal, social, or political restrictions. 2) free from slavery. DERIVATIVES emancipation noun emancipator noun emancipatory adjective. ORIGIN Latin emancipare transfer as property , from mancipium slave …

    English terms dictionary

  • 8 emancipate — [ē man′sə pāt΄, iman′sə pāt΄] vt. emancipated, emancipating [< L emancipatus, pp. of emancipare < e , out + mancipare, to deliver up or make over as property < manceps, purchaser < manus, the hand (see MANUAL) + capere, to take (see… …

    English World dictionary

  • 9 emancipate — v. (D; tr.) to emancipate from (to emancipate serfs from bondage) * * * [ɪ mænsɪpeɪt] (D; tr.) to emancipate from (to emancipate serfs from bondage) …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 10 emancipate — UK [ɪˈmænsɪpeɪt] / US [ɪˈmænsɪˌpeɪt] verb [transitive] Word forms emancipate : present tense I/you/we/they emancipate he/she/it emancipates present participle emancipating past tense emancipated past participle emancipated formal to give freedom… …

    English dictionary

  • 11 emancipate — 1. verb a) To set free from the power of another; to liberate; as: b) To set free, as a minor from a parent; as, a …

    Wiktionary

  • 12 emancipate — verb Emancipate is used with these nouns as the object: ↑slave …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 13 emancipate — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) v. t. liberate, free, release, deliver, manumit, set free, enfranchise. See liberation. Ant., enslave. II (Roget s IV) v. Syn. free, release, liberate, deliver; see free 1 . See Synonym Study at free .… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 14 emancipate — [17] Despite modern associations with women’s liberation, emancipate has no etymological connection with man. It comes from Latin ēmancipāre, which meant originally ‘free from parental power’. This was a compound verb formed from the prefix ex… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 15 emancipate — verb (T) formal to make someone free from social, political, or legal restrictions that limit what they can do: Learning will emancipate the oppressed and engender social change. emancipation noun (U): the emancipation of slaves …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 16 emancipate — [17] Despite modern associations with women’s liberation, emancipate has no etymological connection with man. It comes from Latin ēmancipāre, which meant originally ‘free from parental power’. This was a compound verb formed from the prefix ex… …

    Word origins

  • 17 emancipate — transitive verb ( pated; pating) Etymology: Latin emancipatus, past participle of emancipare, from e + mancipare to transfer ownership of, from mancip , manceps contractor, from manus hand + capere to take more at manual, heave Date: 1613 1. to… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 18 emancipate — emancipative, adj. emancipator, n. /i man seuh payt /, v.t., emancipated, emancipating. 1. to free from restraint, influence, or the like. 2. to free (a slave) from bondage. 3. Roman and Civil Law. to terminate paternal control over. [1615 25; <… …

    Universalium

  • 19 emancipate — Synonyms and related words: affranchise, deliver, discharge, disenthrall, enfranchise, free, let go, let loose, liberate, loose, loosen, manumit, release, rescue, set at large, set at liberty, set free, unbind, unchain, unfetter, unshackle …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 20 emancipate — e|man|ci|pate [ıˈmænsıpeıt] v [T] [Date: 1600 1700; : Latin; Origin: emancipatus, past participle of emancipare, from mancipium ownership ] formal to give someone the political or legal rights that they did not have before ▪ Slaves were… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English