discursive power or faculty

  • 1 Elaborative faculty — Elaborative E*lab o*ra*tive, a. Serving or tending to elaborate; constructing with labor and minute attention to details. [1913 Webster] {Elaborative faculty} (Metaph.), the intellectual power of discerning relations and of viewing objects by… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 reason — I. n. 1. Intellect, mind, sense, understanding, rational faculty, conception, judgment, intuitional faculty, thinking principle, intellectual powers or faculties, discursive power or faculty. 2. Cause, ground, principle, motive, consideration,… …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 3 By reason of — Reason Rea son (r[=e] z n), n. [OE. resoun, F. raison, fr. L. ratio (akin to Goth. ra[thorn]j[=o] number, account, gara[thorn]jan to count, G. rede speech, reden to speak), fr. reri, ratus, to reckon, believe, think. Cf. {Arraign}, {Rate},… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 In all reason — Reason Rea son (r[=e] z n), n. [OE. resoun, F. raison, fr. L. ratio (akin to Goth. ra[thorn]j[=o] number, account, gara[thorn]jan to count, G. rede speech, reden to speak), fr. reri, ratus, to reckon, believe, think. Cf. {Arraign}, {Rate},… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 In reason — Reason Rea son (r[=e] z n), n. [OE. resoun, F. raison, fr. L. ratio (akin to Goth. ra[thorn]j[=o] number, account, gara[thorn]jan to count, G. rede speech, reden to speak), fr. reri, ratus, to reckon, believe, think. Cf. {Arraign}, {Rate},… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 It is reason — Reason Rea son (r[=e] z n), n. [OE. resoun, F. raison, fr. L. ratio (akin to Goth. ra[thorn]j[=o] number, account, gara[thorn]jan to count, G. rede speech, reden to speak), fr. reri, ratus, to reckon, believe, think. Cf. {Arraign}, {Rate},… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 Reason — Rea son (r[=e] z n), n. [OE. resoun, F. raison, fr. L. ratio (akin to Goth. ra[thorn]j[=o] number, account, gara[thorn]jan to count, G. rede speech, reden to speak), fr. reri, ratus, to reckon, believe, think. Cf. {Arraign}, {Rate}, {Ratio},… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8 Virtue — • According to its etymology the word virtue (Latin virtus) signifies manliness or courage Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Virtue     Virtue      …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 9 Michel Foucault — Full name Michel Foucault Born 15 October 1926 Poitiers, France Died 25 June 1984(1984 06 25) (aged 57) Paris, France …

    Wikipedia

  • 10 Judith Butler — Butler during a lecture at the University of Hamburg. April 2007 Full name Judith Butler Born February 24, 1956 (1956 02 24) (age 55) Clevelan …

    Wikipedia

  • 11 aesthetics — /es thet iks/ or, esp. Brit., /ees /, n. (used with a sing. v.) 1. the branch of philosophy dealing with such notions as the beautiful, the ugly, the sublime, the comic, etc., as applicable to the fine arts, with a view to establishing the… …

    Universalium

  • 12 Intellect — • The faculty of thought Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Intellect     Intellect     † …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 13 Immanuel Kant — Kant redirects here. For other uses, see Kant (disambiguation). See also: Kant (surname) Immanuel Kant Immanuel Kant Full name Immanuel Kant Born 22 April 1724 …

    Wikipedia

  • 14 Ian Parker (psychologist) — Ian Parker is a British psychologist who has been a principal exponent of three quite diverse critical traditions inside the discipline. His writing has provided compass points for researchers searching for alternatives to ‘mainstream’ psychology …

    Wikipedia

  • 15 rhetoric — /ret euhr ik/, n. 1. (in writing or speech) the undue use of exaggeration or display; bombast. 2. the art or science of all specialized literary uses of language in prose or verse, including the figures of speech. 3. the study of the effective… …

    Universalium

  • 16 Herbert of Cherbury (Lord) and the Cambridge Platonists — Lord Herbert of Cherbury and the Cambridge Platonists Sarah Hutton The philosophy of Lord Herbert of Cherbury (1582/3–1648) and of the Cambridge Platonists exemplifies the continuities of seventeenth century thought with Renaissance philosophy.… …

    History of philosophy

  • 17 Understanding — Un der*stand ing, n. 1. The act of one who understands a thing, in any sense of the verb; knowledge; discernment; comprehension; interpretation; explanation. [1913 Webster] 2. An agreement of opinion or feeling; adjustment of differences;… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 18 Critique of Pure Reason — Part of a series on Immanuel …

    Wikipedia

  • 19 Continental philosophy — Collective term for the many distinct philospohical traditions, methods, and styles that predominated on the European continent (particularly in France and Germany) from the time of Immanuel Kant. It is usually understood in contrast with… …

    Universalium

  • 20 Critical theory — Horkheimer, Adorno, Habermas David Rasmussen HEGEL, MARX AND THE IDEA OF A CRITICAL THEORY Critical theory1 is a metaphor for a certain kind of theoretical orientation which owes its origin to Hegel and Marx, its systematization to Horkheimer and …

    History of philosophy