diddle

  • 1 diddle — to cheat, swindle, 1806, from dial. duddle, diddle to totter (1630s). Meaning waste time is recorded from 1825. Meaning to have sex with is from 1879; that of to masturbate (especially of women) is from 1950s. More or less unrelated meanings that …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 2 diddle — diddle1 [did′ l] vt. diddled, diddling [dial. duddle, diddle, to totter, akin to DODDER1] 1. Informal to move back and forth in a jerky or rapid manner; jiggle 2. Slang a) to have sexual intercourse with b) …

    English World dictionary

  • 3 Diddle — Did dle, v. i. [Cf. {Daddle}.] To totter, as a child in walking. [Obs.] Quarles. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 Diddle — Did dle, v. t. [Perh. from AS. dyderian to deceive, the letter r being changed to l.] To cheat or overreach. [Colloq.] Beaconsfield. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 diddle — did‧dle [ˈdɪdl] verb [transitive] informal to get money from someone by deceiving them: • I m sure he diddled me out of quite a lot of money! …

    Financial and business terms

  • 6 diddle — ► VERB informal ▪ cheat or swindle. ORIGIN probably from Jeremy Diddler, a character in the farce Raising the Wind (1803) who constantly borrowed small sums of money …

    English terms dictionary

  • 7 diddle — diddle1 diddler, n. /did l/, v.t., diddled, diddling. Informal. to cheat; swindle; hoax. [1800 10; perh. special use of DIDDLE2] diddle2 diddler, n. /did l/, v., diddled, diddling …

    Universalium

  • 8 diddle — [19] The current meaning of diddle, ‘to cheat or swindle’, was probably inspired by Jeremy Diddler, a character who was constantly borrowing money and neglecting to repay it in James Kenney’s play Raising the Wind (1803) (the expression raise the …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 9 diddle — [19] The current meaning of diddle, ‘to cheat or swindle’, was probably inspired by Jeremy Diddler, a character who was constantly borrowing money and neglecting to repay it in James Kenney’s play Raising the Wind (1803) (the expression raise the …

    Word origins

  • 10 diddle — did|dle [ˈdıdl] v [T] BrE informal [Date: 1800 1900; Origin: Perhaps from Diddler, name of a character in a 19th century English play] to get money from someone by deceiving them diddle sb out of sth ▪ They ll diddle you out of your last penny if …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 11 diddle — vb 1. British to cheat. A common colloquial ism recorded since the early 1800s. ► Comedian Ken Dodd insisted on cash for shows to diddle the taxman, his former agent told a jury yesterday. (Daily Mirror, 5 July 1989) In Old English dydrian meant… …

    Contemporary slang

  • 12 diddle — verb (T) diddle sb (out of sth) informal to get money from someone by deceiving them: They ll diddle you out of your last penny if you give them the chance …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 13 diddle — UK [ˈdɪd(ə)l] / US verb [transitive] Word forms diddle : present tense I/you/we/they diddle he/she/it diddles present participle diddling past tense diddled past participle diddled informal to trick or cheat someone He got diddled out of his… …

    English dictionary

  • 14 diddle — 1. tv. to feel someone sexually. (See also feel someone up. Usually objectionable.) □ He was trying to diddle her, and she was trying to watch the movie. □ She moved her hand over, like she was going to diddle him, then she jabbed him in the… …

    Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • 15 Diddle — To rip someone off or to con someone is to diddle them. When you visit England, check your change to make sure you haven t been diddled! …

    The American's guide to speaking British

  • 16 diddle — [[t]dɪ̱d(ə)l[/t]] diddles, diddling, diddled 1) VERB If someone diddles you, they take money from you dishonestly or unfairly. [mainly BRIT, INFORMAL] [V n] They diddled their insurance company by making a false claim. Syn: con 2) VERB: oft V adv …

    English dictionary

  • 17 diddle —    1. to urinate    Literally, to jerk from side to side, which a male may do with his penis after urination to eliminate drips. Dicky Diddle was also rhyming slang for piddle.    2. to masturbate    Of both sexes, again from the jerking movement …

    How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • 18 diddle — verb (diddled; diddling) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1786 transitive verb 1. chiefly dialect to move with short rapid motions 2. to waste (as time) in trifling 3. hoax, swindle 4 …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 19 diddle — 1. noun a) In percussion, two consecutive notes played by the same hand (either RR or LL), similar to the drag, except that by convention diddles are played the as the context in which they are placed b) The penis. 2. verb a) to …

    Wiktionary

  • 20 diddle — Synonyms and related words: ball, bamboozle, be intimate, beat, beguile, beguile of, beguile the time, betray, bilk, bluff, bunco, burn, burn daylight, cajole, cheat, cheat on, chisel, chouse, chouse out of, circumvent, cog, cog the dice, cohabit …

    Moby Thesaurus