📌 courtliness 📚 🧬 Academic Dictionaries and Encyclopedias ⚗

courtliness

  • 1 Courtliness — Court li*ness ( l? n?s), n. [From {Courtly}.] The quality of being courtly; elegance or dignity of manners. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 courtliness — index consideration (sympathetic regard), courtesy, respect Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 3 courtliness — courtly ► ADJECTIVE (courtlier, courtliest) ▪ very dignified and polite. DERIVATIVES courtliness noun …

    English terms dictionary

  • 4 courtliness — noun see courtly I …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 5 courtliness — See courtly. * * * …

    Universalium

  • 6 courtliness — noun The quality of being courtly; refinement of manners …

    Wiktionary

  • 7 courtliness — Synonyms and related words: amenities, augustness, chivalrousness, chivalry, civilities, civility, comity, convention, courtly politeness, decencies, decorum, dignifiedness, dignity, diplomatic code, elegance, elegancies, etiquette, exquisite… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 8 courtliness — (Roget s IV) n. Syn. gallantry, refinement, politeness; see courtesy 1 , elegance 1 …

    English dictionary for students

  • 9 courtliness — n. quality of being courtly, politeness, quality of having elegant manners …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 10 courtliness — n 1. politeness, politesse, civility, mannerliness, courteousness, courtesy; respect, respectfulness, deference; decorousness, properness, formality, formalness, ceremony, ceremonialism; correctness, tact, diplomacy, savoir faire; gentlemanliness …

    A Note on the Style of the synonym finder

  • 11 courtliness — court·li·ness …

    English syllables

  • 12 courtliness — noun elegance suggestive of a royal court • Derivationally related forms: ↑courtly • Hypernyms: ↑elegance …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 13 courtly — courtliness, n. /kawrt lee, kohrt /, adj., courtlier, courtliest, adv. adj. 1. polite, refined, or elegant: courtly manners. 2. flattering; obsequious. 3. noting, pertaining to, or suitable for the court of a sovereign. adv. 4. in a courtly… …

    Universalium

  • 14 Courtly love — God Speed! by Edmund Blair Leighton, 1900: a late Victorian view of a lady giving a favor to a knight about to do battle Courtly love was a medieval European conception of nobly and chivalrously expressing love and admiration.[1] Generally,… …

    Wikipedia

  • 15 Courtesies — Courtesy Cour te*sy (k?r t? s?), n.; pl. {Courtesies} ( s?z). [OE. cortaisie, corteisie, courtesie, OF. curteisie, cortoisie, OF. curteisie, cortoisie, F. courtoisie, fr. curteis, corteis. See {Courteous}.] 1. Politeness; civility; urbanity;… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 16 Courtesy — Cour te*sy (k?r t? s?), n.; pl. {Courtesies} ( s?z). [OE. cortaisie, corteisie, courtesie, OF. curteisie, cortoisie, OF. curteisie, cortoisie, F. courtoisie, fr. curteis, corteis. See {Courteous}.] 1. Politeness; civility; urbanity; courtliness.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 17 Courtesy title — Courtesy Cour te*sy (k?r t? s?), n.; pl. {Courtesies} ( s?z). [OE. cortaisie, corteisie, courtesie, OF. curteisie, cortoisie, OF. curteisie, cortoisie, F. courtoisie, fr. curteis, corteis. See {Courteous}.] 1. Politeness; civility; urbanity;… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 18 Raimon de Miraval — Raimon de Miraval(h) (c. 1135/1160 ndash; c. 1220) was a troubadour (fl. 1180 ndash;1220) and, according to his vida , a poor knight from Carcassonne who owned less than a quarter of the castle of Miraval [Mireval] . Graham Leigh, 28.] Favoured… …

    Wikipedia

  • 19 Peire Rogier — or Rotgiers (born c. 1145) was a twelfth century Auvergnat troubadour (fl. 1160 ndash; 1180) and cathedral canon from Clermont. He left his cathedral to become a travelling minstrel before settling down for a time in Narbonne at the court of the… …

    Wikipedia

  • 20 gap —    The term gap was applied to a particular genre of TROUBADOUR lyric poetry popularized by GUILLAUME IX, the first troubadour. Essentially the gap was a boasting song, in which the singer presents himself as a master in his field either the… …

    Encyclopedia of medieval literature