consuetude

  • 1 Consuetude — Con sue*tude (?; 144), n. [L. consuetudo. See {Custom}.] Custom, habit; usage. [R.] [1913 Webster] To observe this consuetude or law. Barnes . [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 consuetude — late 14c., from M.Fr. consuetude, from L. consuetudo, from consuetus, pp. of consuescere to accustom (see CUSTOM (Cf. custom)) …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 3 consuetude — index behavior, custom, habit, manner (behavior), practice (custom), usage Burton s Legal Thesaurus …

    Law dictionary

  • 4 consuetude — [kän′swi to͞od΄, kän′swityo͞od΄] n. [OFr < L consuetudo: see CUSTOM] established custom or usage consuetudinary [kän′swito͞od′ n er΄ē, kän′swityo͞od′ n er΄ē] adj …

    English World dictionary

  • 5 consuetude — noun /ˈkɒnswɪtjuːd/ Custom, familiarity. “the stain hath become engrained by time and consuetude; let thy reformation be cautious, as it is just and wise.” …

    Wiktionary

  • 6 consuetude — n. a custom, esp. one having legal force in Scotland. Derivatives: consuetudinary adj. Etymology: ME f. OF consuetude or L consuetudo dinis f. consuetus accustomed …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 7 consuetude — noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin consuetudo more at custom Date: 14th century social usage ; custom • consuetudinary adjective …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 8 consuetude — /kon swi toohd , tyoohd /, n. custom, esp. as having legal force. [1350 1400; ME < L consuetudo, equiv. to con CON + sue (short s. of suescere to become accustomed, akin to suus one s own) + tudo TUDE] * * * …

    Universalium

  • 9 consuetude — (Roget s Thesaurus II) noun A habitual way of behaving: custom, habit, habitude, manner, practice, praxis, usage, usance, use, way, wont. See USUAL …

    English dictionary for students

  • 10 consuetude — con·sue·tude || kÉ’nswɪtjuːd n. custom having legal authority …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 11 consuetude — [ kɒnswɪtju:d] noun chiefly Scottish a custom, especially one with legal force. Derivatives consuetudinary tju:dɪn(ə)ri adjective Origin ME: from OFr., or from L. consuetudo (see custom) …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 12 consuetude — con·sue·tude …

    English syllables

  • 13 consuetude — con•sue•tude [[t]ˈkɒn swɪˌtud, ˌtyud[/t]] n. a social usage; custom • Etymology: 1350–1400; ME < L consuētūdō con sue•tu′di•nar′y, adj …

    From formal English to slang

  • 14 consuetude — /ˈkɒnswɪtjud/ (say konswityoohd), / tʃud/ (say choohd) noun custom, especially as having legal force. {Middle English, from Latin consuētūdo custom} …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 15 consuetude —   n. established custom.    ♦ consuetudinal, a.    ♦ consuetudinary, a.; n. book of customs and laws of an association, especially of monastic life …

    Dictionary of difficult words

  • 16 consuetude — /konswatyuwdow/ A custom; an established usage or practice; duties; taxes …

    Black's law dictionary

  • 17

  • 18 consuetude contra rationem introducta potius usurpatio quam consuetude appellari debet — /konswatyuwdow kontra raeshiyownam intradakta powsh(iy)as yuwsarpeysh(iy)ow kwaem konswatyuwdow aepaleray debat/ A custom introduced against reason ought rather to be called a usurpation than a custom …

    Black's law dictionary

  • 19

  • 20 consuetude anglicana — /konswatyuwdow srjglakeyna/ The custom of England; the ancient common law, as distinguished from lex, the Roman or civil law …

    Black's law dictionary