completeness

  • 1 Completeness — Com*plete ness, n. The state of being complete. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 completeness — index conclusion (outcome), entirety, fait accompli, finality, quorum, totality, whole Burton s Legal …

    Law dictionary

  • 3 Completeness — In general, an object is complete if nothing needs to be added to it. This notion is made more specific in various fields. Contents 1 Logical completeness 2 Mathematical completeness 3 Computing 4 …

    Wikipedia

  • 4 Completeness — (Roget s Thesaurus) < N PARAG:Completeness >N GRP: N 1 Sgm: N 1 completeness completeness &c. >Adj. Sgm: N 1 completion completion &c. 729 Sgm: N 1 integration integration Sgm: N 1 allness allness GRP: N 2 Sgm …

    English dictionary for students

  • 5 completeness — complete ► ADJECTIVE 1) having all the necessary or appropriate parts; entire. 2) having run its full course; finished. 3) to the greatest extent or degree; total. 4) skilled at every aspect of an activity: the complete footballer. 5) (complete… …

    English terms dictionary

  • 6 completeness — noun see complete I …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 7 Completeness — Vollständigkeit ist eine Eigenschaft formaler Systeme bzw. Kalküle. Man unterscheidet semantische Vollständigkeit („Alles, was wahr ist, ist beweisbar.“), klassische Vollständigkeit („Eine der zwei Aussagen und ist stets beweisbar.“) und… …

    Deutsch Wikipedia

  • 8 completeness — See completely. * * * Concept of the adequacy of a formal system that is employed both in proof theory and in model theory (see logic). In proof theory, a formal system is said to be syntactically complete if and only if every closed sentence in… …

    Universalium

  • 9 completeness — noun the state or condition of being complete Ant: incompleteness …

    Wiktionary

  • 10 completeness — Intuitively, a logical system is complete if everything that we want can be derived in it. Thus a formalization of logic is complete if all logically valid forms of argument are derivable in the system; a system designed to codify mathematical… …

    Philosophy dictionary

  • 11 completeness — (Roget s Thesaurus II) noun The state of being entirely whole: entirety, integrity, oneness, totality, wholeness. See PART …

    English dictionary for students

  • 12 completeness — com plete·ness || nɪs n. wholeness, perfection, state of being complete; state of being completed …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 13 completeness — com·plete·ness …

    English syllables

  • 14 completeness — noun 1. the state of being complete and entire; having everything that is needed (Freq. 2) • Ant: ↑incompleteness • Derivationally related forms: ↑complete • Hypernyms: ↑integrity, ↑unity, ↑ …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 15 Completeness (order theory) — In the mathematical area of order theory, completeness properties assert the existence of certain infima or suprema of a given partially ordered set (poset). A special use of the term refers to complete partial orders or complete lattices.… …

    Wikipedia

  • 16 Completeness of the real numbers — Intuitively, completeness implies that there are not any “gaps” (in Dedekind s terminology) or “missing points” in the real number line. This contrasts with the rational numbers, whose corresponding number line has a “gap” at each irrational… …

    Wikipedia

  • 17 Completeness (statistics) — In statistics, completeness is a property of a statistic in relation to a model for a set of observed data. In essence, it is a condition which ensures that the parameters of the probability distribution representing the model can all be… …

    Wikipedia

  • 18 Completeness axiom — In mathematics the completeness axiom, also called Dedekind completeness of the real numbers, is a fundamental property of the set R of real numbers. It is the property that distinguishes R from other ordered fields, especially from the set of… …

    Wikipedia

  • 19 Completeness of atomic initial sequents — In sequent calculus, the completeness of atomic initial sequents states that initial sequents A ⊢ A (where A is an arbitrary formula) can be derived from only atomic initial sequents p ⊢ p (where p is an atomic formula). This theorem plays a role …

    Wikipedia

  • 20 Completeness (cryptography) — In cryptography, a boolean function is said to be complete if the value of each output bit depends on all input bits. This is a desirable property to have in an encryption cipher, so that if one bit of the input (plaintext) is changed, every bit… …

    Wikipedia