bother

  • 1 Bother — may refer to:* Bother (song), a 2003 hard rock song * Bother! The Brain of Pooh , a one man show …

    Wikipedia

  • 2 bother — [n] trouble, inconvenience ado, aggravation, annoyance, anxiety, bellyache*, botheration, bustle, care, concern, difficulty, distress, drag*, exasperation, flurry, fuss, headache*, irritant, irritation, molestation, nudge, nuisance, pain, pain in …

    New thesaurus

  • 3 bother — ► VERB 1) take the trouble to do. 2) worry, disturb, or upset. 3) (bother with/about) feel concern about or interest in. ► NOUN 1) trouble and fuss. 2) (a bother) a cause of trouble or fuss …

    English terms dictionary

  • 4 Bother — Both er, n. One who, or that which, bothers; state of perplexity or annoyance; embarrassment; worry; disturbance; petty trouble; as, to be in a bother. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 bother — [bäth′ər] vt. [earlier bodder (in SWIFT Jonathan); prob. Anglo Ir for POTHER] 1. to worry or trouble, esp. with petty annoyances; harass, pester, etc. 2. to bewilder or fluster 3. to cause discomfort to [her sore foot bothers her] 4. to disturb;… …

    English World dictionary

  • 6 Bother — Both er, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Bothered} (?); p. pr. & vb. n. {Bothering}.] [Cf. Ir. buaidhirt trouble, buaidhrim I vex.] To annoy; to trouble; to worry; to perplex. See {Pother}. [1913 Webster] Note: The imperative is sometimes used as an… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 Bother — Both er, v. i. To feel care or anxiety; to make or take trouble; to be troublesome. [1913 Webster] Without bothering about it. H. James. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8 bother — index aggravate (annoy), annoy, badger, bait (harass), burden, care (regard) …

    Law dictionary

  • 9 bother — (v.) 1718, probably from Anglo Irish pother, since its earliest use was by Irish writers Sheridan, Swift, Sterne. Perhaps from Ir. bodhairim I deafen. Related: Bothered; bothering. As a noun from 1803 …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 10 bother — vb vex, *annoy, irk Analogous words: *worry, harass, harry, pester, tease, tantalize: interfere, *meddle, tamper: *puzzle, perplex, distract: trouble, inconvenience, incommode, discommode Antonyms: comfort Contrasted words: solace, console (see… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 11 bother — both|er1 W3S1 [ˈbɔðə US ˈba:ðər] v ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(make an effort)¦ 2¦(worry)¦ 3¦(annoy)¦ 4 somebody can t/couldn t be bothered (to do something) 5¦(cause pain)¦ 6 sorry to bother you 7¦(frighten)¦ 8 not bother yourself/not bother your head 9 bother… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 12 bother — 1 verb 1 MAKE AN EFFORT (I, T) to make the effort to do something (+ about/with) BrE: I m too busy to bother about fixing it now. | (not) bother to do sth: Unfortunately he didn t bother to check the exact wording of the contract before he signed …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 13 bother — I UK [ˈbɒðə(r)] / US [ˈbɑðər] verb Word forms bother : present tense I/you/we/they bother he/she/it bothers present participle bothering past tense bothered past participle bothered *** 1) [intransitive, usually in negatives or questions] if you… …

    English dictionary

  • 14 bother — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun VERB + BOTHER ▪ have (esp. BrE) ▪ I had a little bother finding your house. ▪ cause, give sb (both esp. BrE) ▪ Your little boy didn t give me any bother …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 15 bother — I n. 1) a bother to (he was a bother to everyone) 2) a bother to + inf. (it was no bother to take care of them) 3) (BE) a spot of bother 4) (esp. BE) he had a lot of bother finding our house II v. 1) (D; intr., tr.) to bother about, with (she… …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 16 bother — [[t]bɒ̱ðə(r)[/t]] ♦♦♦ bothers, bothering, bothered 1) VERB: with brd neg If you do not bother to do something or if you do not bother with it, you do not do it, consider it, or use it because you think it is unnecessary or because you are too… …

    English dictionary

  • 17 bother — both|er1 [ baðər ] verb ** 1. ) intransitive usually in negatives or questions if you do not bother to do something, you do not do it, either because there seems to be no good reason or because it involves too much effort: bother to do something …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 18 bother — 01. Don t [bother] me right now, I m trying to do my homework. 02. We didn t [bother] to report the accident to police because the damage to our car was so small. 03. Doesn t it [bother] you that your roommate never does the vacuuming? 04. My… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 19 bother — /bodh euhr/, v.t. 1. to give trouble to; annoy; pester; worry: His baby sister bothered him for candy. 2. to bewilder; confuse: His inability to understand the joke bothered him. v.i. 3. to take the trouble; trouble or inconvenience oneself: Don… …

    Universalium

  • 20 bother*/*/ — [ˈbɒðə] verb I 1) if you do not bother to do something, you do not do it because it is not sensible or because you feel lazy It was such a stupid question, I didn t even bother to reply.[/ex] Don t bother inviting Janet.[/ex] Don t bother about… …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English