📌 abdicate 📚 🧬 Academic Dictionaries and Encyclopedias ⚗

abdicate

  • 1 Abdicate — Ab di*cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Abdicated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Abdicating}.] [L. abdicatus, p. p. of abdicare; ab + dicare to proclaim, akin to dicere to say. See {Diction}.] 1. To surrender or relinquish, as sovereign power; to withdraw… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 Abdicate — Ab di*cate, v. i. To relinquish or renounce a throne, or other high office or dignity. [1913 Webster] Though a king may abdicate for his own person, he cannot abdicate for the monarchy. Burke. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 abdicate — abdicate, renounce, resign are synonymous when they are used in the sense of to give up formally or definitely a position of trust, honor, or glory, or its concomitant authority or prerogatives. Abdicate is the precise word to use when that which …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 4 abdicate — I verb abandon, back out, be relieved, cede, demit, drop, forego, forfeit, give the reins to, give up, hand over, hold off, leave, let go, make way for, quit one s hold, relinquish, resign, retire, stand aside, surrender, unclench, vacate office …

    Law dictionary

  • 5 abdicate — (v.) 1540s, to disown, disinherit (children), from L. abdicatus, pp. of abdicare to disown, disavow, reject (specifically abdicare magistratu renounce office ), from ab away (see AB (Cf. ab )) + dicare proclaim, from stem of dicere to speak, to… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 6 abdicate — [v] give up a right, position, or power abandon, abjure, abnegate, bag it*, bail out*, cede, demit, drop, forgo, give up, leave, leave high and dry*, leave holding the bag*, leave in the lurch*, opt out*, quit, quitclaim, relinquish, renounce,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 7 abdicate — ► VERB 1) (of a monarch) renounce the throne. 2) fail to fulfil or undertake (a duty). DERIVATIVES abdication noun. ORIGIN Latin abdicare renounce …

    English terms dictionary

  • 8 abdicate — [ab′di kāt΄] vt., vi. abdicated, abdicating [< L abdicatus, pp. of abdicare, to deny, renounce < ab , off + dicare, to proclaim, akin to dicere, to say: see DICTION] 1. to give up formally (a high office, throne, authority, etc.) 2. to… …

    English World dictionary

  • 9 abdicate — UK [ˈæbdɪkeɪt] / US [ˈæbdɪˌkeɪt] verb Word forms abdicate : present tense I/you/we/they abdicate he/she/it abdicates present participle abdicating past tense abdicated past participle abdicated 1) [intransitive/transitive] if a king or queen… …

    English dictionary

  • 10 abdicate — verb ( cated; cating) Etymology: Latin abdicatus, past participle of abdicare, from ab + dicare to proclaim more at diction Date: 1541 transitive verb 1. to cast off ; discard …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 11 abdicate — verb /ˈæbdɪkeɪt/ a) To surrender, renounce or relinquish, as sovereign power; to withdraw definitely from filling or exercising, as a high office, station, dignity; as, to abdicate the throne, the crown, the papacy. Note: The word abdicate was… …

    Wiktionary

  • 12 abdicate — verb Abdicate is used with these nouns as the subject: ↑king, ↑queen Abdicate is used with these nouns as the object: ↑responsibility, ↑right, ↑throne …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 13 abdicate — v. (D; intr.) to abdicate from (the king has abdicated from the throne) USAGE NOTE: One can also say the king has abdicated the throne; most frequently, one simply says: the king has abdicated. * * * [ æbdɪkeɪt] (D; intr.) to abdicate from (USAGE …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 14 abdicate — ab|di|cate [ˈæbdıkeıt] v [I and T] [Date: 1500 1600; : Latin; Origin: , past participle of abdicare, from ab away, off + dicare to say publicly ] 1.) to give up the position of being king or queen ▪ King Alfonso XIII abdicated in favour of his… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 15 abdicate — ab|di|cate [ æbdı,keıt ] verb 1. ) intransitive or transitive if a king or queen abdicates, he or she formally gives up power 2. ) transitive FORMAL to stop accepting a particular responsibility or obligation that you have: abdicate (your)… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 16 abdicate — abdicable /ab di keuh beuhl/, adj. abdicative /ab di kay tiv, keuh /, adj. abdicator, n. /ab di kayt /, v., abdicated, abdicating. v.i. 1. to renounce or relinquish a throne, right, power, claim, responsibility, or the like, esp. in a formal… …

    Universalium

  • 17 Abdicate — To give up all hope of ever having a flat stomach. If you drink 24 beers a day you must be prepared to abdicate seeing your toes again …

    Dictionary of american slang

  • 18 abdicate — [[t]æ̱bdɪkeɪt[/t]] abdicates, abdicating, abdicated 1) VERB If a king or queen abdicates, he or she gives up being king or queen. The last French king was Louis Philippe, who abdicated in 1848. [Also V n] Derived words: abdication… …

    English dictionary

  • 19 abdicate — verb (I, T) 1 to give up the position of being king or queen 2 abdicate responsibility formal to refuse to accept responsibility for something any longer abdication noun (C, U) …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 20 abdicate —   Ha alele, waiho.    ♦ Abdicate a throne, ha alele noho ali i …

    English-Hawaiian dictionary