Snag

  • 1 Snag — Snag, n. [Prov. E., n., a lump on a tree where a branch has been cut off; v., to cut off the twigs and small branches from a tree, of Celtic origin; cf. Gael. snaigh, snaidh, to cut down, to prune, to sharpen, p. p. snaighte, snaidhte, cut off,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 snag — snag; snag·ged; snag·ger; snag·gle; snag·gled; snag·gy; snag·rel; …

    English syllables

  • 3 snag — [snag] n. [< Scand, as in ON snagi, wooden peg, Norw snage, sharp point, projection, akin to Ger schnake] 1. a piece, part, or point that sticks out, esp. one that is sharp or rough, as the broken end of a tree limb ☆ 2. an underwater tree… …

    English World dictionary

  • 4 Snag — Snag, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Snagged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Snagging}.] 1. To cut the snags or branches from, as the stem of a tree; to hew roughly. [Prov. Eng.] Halliwell. [1913 Webster] 2. To injure or destroy, as a steamboat or other vessel, by a… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 snag — [n] complication in situation bar, barrier, blockade, brake, bug*, catch, Catch 22, clog, crimp, cropper, crunch, curb, difficulty, disadvantage, drag*, drawback, fix*, glitch, hamper, hitch, holdup*, hole*, hurdle, impediment, inconvenience,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 6 snag — ► NOUN 1) an unexpected or hidden obstacle or drawback. 2) a sharp, angular, or jagged projection. 3) a small rent or tear. ► VERB (snagged, snagging) 1) catch or tear on a snag. 2) N. Amer …

    English terms dictionary

  • 7 snag|gy — «SNAG ee», adjective, gi|er, gi|est. 1. having snags. 2. projecting sharply or roughly …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 8 snag — index block, complex (entanglement), damper (stopper), entanglement (confusion), impediment, o …

    Law dictionary

  • 9 snag — n *obstacle, obstruction, impediment, bar Analogous words: *projection, protuberance: *difficulty, hardship, vicissitude: barring or bar, blocking or block, hindering or hindrance (see corresponding verbs at HINDER) …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 10 snag- — *snag germ.?, Verb: nhd. kriechen; ne. crawl (Verb); Hinweis: s. *snagila ; Etymologie: idg. *sneg , Verb, kriechen, Pokorny 974; Literatur: Falk/Torp 519 …

    Germanisches Wörterbuch

  • 11 snag — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ big, major ▪ little, minor, slight, small ▪ A minor snag is that it s expensive. ▪ …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 12 snag — I. /snæg / (say snag) noun 1. a short, projecting stump, as of a branch broken or cut off. 2. any sharp or rough projection. 3. a tree or part of a tree held fast in the bottom of a river or other water and forming an impediment or danger to… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 13 Snag — In forest ecology, a snag refers to a standing, partly or completely dead tree, often missing a top or most of the smaller branches, while in freshwater ecology it refers to trees, branches and other pieces of naturally occurring wood found in a… …

    Wikipedia

  • 14 snag — 1. n. a difficulty. □ There’s a little snag in our plan. □ We ran into a little snag, I’m sorry to say. 2. n. an ugly (young) woman. □ She’s not a snag! She’s lovely. □ …

    Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • 15 snag — snaglike, adj. /snag/, n., v., snagged, snagging. n. 1. a tree or part of a tree held fast in the bottom of a river, lake, etc., and forming an impediment or danger to navigation. 2. a short, projecting stump, as of a branch broken or cut off. 3 …

    Universalium

  • 16 snag — [[t]snæg[/t]] n. v. snagged, snag•ging 1) a tree or part of a tree held fast in the bottom of a river, lake, etc., and forming an impediment or danger to navigation 2) a short, projecting stump, as of a branch broken off 3) any sharp or rough… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 17 snag — I UK [snæɡ] / US noun [countable] Word forms snag : singular snag plural snags 1) a problem or disadvantage that you have not planned for I m afraid there s one snag – I forgot to bring my money. 2) a) a small damaged area in a piece of clothing …

    English dictionary

  • 18 snag — I. noun Etymology: perhaps of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse snagi clothes peg Date: circa 1587 1. a. a tree or branch embedded in a lake or stream bed and constituting a hazard to navigation b. a standing dead tree 2. a rough sharp or… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 19 snag — n. obstacle (colloq.) 1) to hit a snag jagged tear 2) to get a snag (in one s stocking) * * * [snæg] [ obstacle ] (colloq.) to hit a snag [ jagged tear ] to get a snag (in one s stocking) …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 20 snag — snag1 [snæg] n [Date: 1500 1600; Origin: Probably from a Scandinavian language] 1.) a problem or disadvantage, especially one that is not very serious, which you had not expected ▪ It s an interesting job. The only snag is that it s not very well …

    Dictionary of contemporary English