Seasonably

  • 1 seasonably — adv. Used synonymously with reasonably. Webster s New World Law Dictionary. Susan Ellis Wild. 2000 …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 seasonably — adverb a) In due season; at an opportune or fitting time. ...having very long suspended our conference about the freshly mentiond Subject, it was so newly begun when you came in, that we shall scarce need to repeat any thing to acquaint you With… …

    Wiktionary

  • 3 seasonably — adverb 1. in accordance with the season it was seasonably cold • Ant: ↑unseasonably • Derived from adjective: ↑seasonable 2. at an opportune time your letter arrived apropos • Syn: ↑ …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 4 Seasonably — Seasonable Sea son*a*ble, a. Occurring in good time, in due season, or in proper time for the purpose; suitable to the season; opportune; timely; as, a seasonable supply of rain. [1913 Webster] Mercy is seasonable in the time of affliction.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 seasonably — adverb see seasonable …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 6 seasonably — See seasonable. * * * …

    Universalium

  • 7 seasonably — adv. in a timely manner, at the proper time, at the appropriate time …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 8 seasonably — ad. In due time, sufficiently early, in season, opportunely …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 9 seasonably — sea·son·ably …

    English syllables

  • 10 seasonably — See: seasonable …

    English dictionary

  • 11 seasonably — Acting at or within the time agreed, or if no time is agreed, at or within a reasonable time. UCC § 1 204(3) …

    Ballentine's law dictionary

  • 12 seasonably turn — A term often employed in a rule of the road, meaning that the operators of vehicles proceeding in the opposite direction shall, upon meeting in the highway, turn to the right in such time that neither shall be retarded in his progress by reason… …

    Ballentine's law dictionary

  • 13 cure — vb cured, cur·ing vt: to deal with in a way that eliminates or corrects: as a: to use judicial procedures to undo (damage to a litigant s case caused by procedural errors made during a trial) subsequent proceedings cured harm caused by trial… …

    Law dictionary

  • 14 dishonor — dis·hon·or 1 n: refusal on the part of the issuer (as a bank) to pay or accept commercial paper (as a check) when it is presented see also wrongful dishonor dishonor 2 vt: to refuse to pay or accept a bank dishonor ing the checks for insufficient …

    Law dictionary

  • 15 well-timed — I adjective done or happening at the appropriate or proper time a timely warning with timely treatment the patient has a good chance of recovery a seasonable time for discussion the book s publication was well timed • Syn: ↑timely, ↑ …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 16 Apropos — Ap ro*pos ([a^]p r[ o]*p[=o] ), a. & adv. [F. [ a] propos; [ a] (L. ad) + propos purpose, L. proposium plan, purpose, fr. proponere to propose. See {Propound}.] 1. Opportunely or opportune; seasonably or seasonable. [1913 Webster] A tale… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 17 Betime — Be*time , Betimes Be*times , adv. [Pref. be (for by) + time; that is, by the proper time. The s is an adverbial ending.] 1. In good season or time; before it is late; seasonably; early. [1913 Webster] To measure life learn thou betimes. Milton.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 18 Betimes — Betime Be*time , Betimes Be*times , adv. [Pref. be (for by) + time; that is, by the proper time. The s is an adverbial ending.] 1. In good season or time; before it is late; seasonably; early. [1913 Webster] To measure life learn thou betimes.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 19 Early — Ear ly ([ e]r l[y^]), adv. [OE. erli, erliche, AS. [=ae]rl[=i]ce; [=ae]r sooner + l[=i]c like. See {Ere}, and {Like}.] Soon; in good season; seasonably; betimes; as, come early. [1913 Webster] Those that me early shall find me. Prov. viii. 17.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 20 Interpose — In ter*pose , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Interposed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Interposing}.] [F. interposer. See {Inter }, and {Pose}, v. t.] [1913 Webster] 1. To place between; as, to interpose a screen between the eye and the light. [1913 Webster] Mountains …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English