Repel

  • 1 Repel — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Repel País …

    Wikipedia Español

  • 2 repel — [ri pel′] vt. repelled, repelling [ME repellen < L repellere, to drive back < re , back + pellere, to drive: see PULSE1] 1. to drive or force back; hold or ward off [to repel an attack] 2. to refuse to accept, agree to, or submit to; reject …

    English World dictionary

  • 3 Repel — Re**pel (r? p?l ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Repelled} ( p?ld ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Repelling}.] [L. repellere, repulsum; pref. re re + pellere to drive. See {Pulse} a beating, and cf. {Repulse}, {Repeal}.] 1. To drive back; to force to return; to check …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 repel — [v1] push away; repulse beat back, beat off, brush off, buck, cast aside, chase away, check, confront, cool*, cut, decline, dismiss, disown, dispute, drive away, drive back, drive off, duel, fend off, fight, force back, force off, give cold… …

    New thesaurus

  • 5 Repel — Re*pel , v. i. To act with force in opposition to force impressed; to exercise repulsion. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 Repel — is a village and commune in the Vosges département of northeastern France.ee also*Communes of the Vosges department …

    Wikipedia

  • 7 repel — I (disgust) verb alienate, appall, be unpalatable, cause aversion, cause dislike, displease, excite dislike, fill with loathing, frighten, give offense, grate, horrify, incense, irritate, make one shudder, make one sick, make unwelcome, nauseate …

    Law dictionary

  • 8 repel — early 15c., to drive away, remove, from O.Fr. repeller, from L. repellere to drive back, from re back + pellere to drive, strike (see PULSE (Cf. pulse) (1)). Meaning to affect (a person) with distaste or aversion is from 1817 …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 9 repel — has inflected forms repelled, repelling …

    Modern English usage

  • 10 repel — ► VERB (repelled, repelling) 1) drive or force back or away. 2) be repulsive or distasteful to. 3) formal refuse to accept; reject. 4) (of a magnetic pole or electric field) force (something similarly magnetized or charged) away. 5) (of a… …

    English terms dictionary

  • 11 Repel — 48° 20′ 47″ N 5° 58′ 24″ E / 48.3463888889, 5.97333333333 …

    Wikipédia en Français

  • 12 repel — [[t]rɪpe̱l[/t]] repels, repelling, repelled 1) VERB When an army repels an attack, they successfully fight and drive back soldiers from another army who have attacked them. [FORMAL] [V n] They have fifty thousand troops along the border ready to… …

    English dictionary

  • 13 repel — repellence, repellency, n. repeller, n. repellingly, adv. repellingness, n. /ri pel /, v., repelled, repelling. v.t. 1. to drive or force back (an assailant, invader, etc.). 2. to thrust back or away …

    Universalium

  • 14 repel — UK [rɪˈpel] / US verb Word forms repel : present tense I/you/we/they repel he/she/it repels present participle repelling past tense repelled past participle repelled 1) [transitive] if something repels you, you think that it is extremely… …

    English dictionary

  • 15 repel — [c]/rəˈpɛl / (say ruh pel) verb (repelled, repelling) –verb (t) 1. to drive or force back (an assailant, invader, etc.). 2. to thrust back or away; reject: he repelled several useless suggestions. 3. to resist effectually (an attack, onslaught):… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 16 repel — re|pel [rıˈpel] v past tense and past participle repelled present participle repelling [Date: 1400 1500; : Latin; Origin: repellere, from pellere to drive ] 1.) [T] if something repels you, it is so unpleasant that you do not want to be near it,… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 17 repel — verb repelled, repelling 1 (T) if something repels you, you want to avoid it because you do not like it: Her heavy make up and cheap scent repelled him. 2 (T) to fight a group or military force and make them stop attacking you: repel invaders |… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 18 repel — re|pel [ rı pel ] verb 1. ) transitive if something repels you, you think that it is extremely unpleasant and you want to avoid it 2. ) transitive to keep something away or prevent it from entering something: The wheat is genetically engineered… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 19 repel — re•pel [[t]rɪˈpɛl[/t]] v. pelled, pel•ling 1) to drive or force back (an assailant, invader, etc.) 2) to thrust back or away 3) to fail to mix with: Water and oil repel each other[/ex] 4) to resist the absorption of: This coat repels rain[/ex] 5) …

    From formal English to slang

  • 20 repel — verb (repelled; repelling) Etymology: Middle English repellen, from Middle French repeller, from Latin repellere, from re + pellere to drive more at felt Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. a. to drive back ; repulse …

    New Collegiate Dictionary