Put in a stable

  • 1 stable — [[t]ste͟ɪb(ə)l[/t]] ♦♦ stabler, stablest, stables, stabling, stabled 1) ADJ GRADED If something is stable, it is not likely to change or come to an end suddenly. The price of oil should remain stable for the rest of 1992. ...a stable marriage.… …

    English dictionary

  • 2 stable — sta·ble || steɪbl n. structure in which horses and other animals are housed; racing establishment; race horses belonging to a racing establishment adj. steady, firm, fixed; not shaky; lasting; dependable, faithful; not susceptible to change;… …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 3 Stable vices — are bad habits of equines, especially horses. They usually develop as a result of being confined with insufficient exercise. Vices can develop out of boredom or hunger, excess energy, isolation, and occasionally may be learned by observing other… …

    Wikipedia

  • 4 stable — Ⅰ. stable [1] ► ADJECTIVE (stabler, stablest) 1) not likely to give way or overturn; firmly fixed. 2) not deteriorating in health after an injury or operation. 3) emotionally well balanced. 4) not likely to change or fail …

    English terms dictionary

  • 5 Stable — Sta ble, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Stabled} ( b ld); p. pr. & vb. n. {Stabling} ( bl[i^]ng).] To put or keep in a stable. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 stable — [adj] constant, fixed; resistant abiding, anchored, balanced, brick wall*, calm, deeprooted, durable, enduring, equable, established, even, fast, firm, immutable, invariable, lasting, nailed, perdurable, permanent, poised, reliable, resolute,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 7 stable — I UK [ˈsteɪb(ə)l] / US adjective ** 1) a) not changing frequently and not likely to suddenly become worse People have become accustomed to a stable economic situation. The marine environment is relatively stable. Children benefit from stable… …

    English dictionary

  • 8 stable — sta|ble1 [ steıbl ] adjective ** 1. ) not changing frequently and not likely to suddenly become worse: People have become accustomed to a stable economic situation. The marine environment is relatively stable. Children benefit from stable… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 9 stable — stable1 adjective (stabler, stablest) 1》 not likely to give way or overturn; firmly fixed. 2》 not likely to change or fail.     ↘not deteriorating in health after an injury or operation.     ↘emotionally well balanced. 3》 not liable to undergo… …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 10 stable — 1. adj. (stabler, stablest) 1 firmly fixed or established; not easily adjusted, destroyed, or altered (a stable structure; a stable government). 2 firm, resolute; not wavering or fickle (a stable and steadfast friend). 3 Chem. (of a compound) not …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 11 stable — sta|ble1 W3 [ˈsteıbəl] adj [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: estable, from Latin stabilis, from stare to stand ] 1.) steady and not likely to move or change ≠ ↑unstable →↑stability ▪ A wide base will make the structure much more stable. in… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 12 stable — I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French estable, stable, from Latin stabulum, from stare to stand more at stand Date: 13th century 1. a building in which domestic animals are sheltered and fed; especially such a building having… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 13 put up — {v.} 1a. To make and pack (especially a lunch or medicine); get ready; prepare. * /Every morning Mother puts up lunches for the three children./ * /The druggist put up the medicine that the doctor had prescribed./ Compare: MAKE UP(1). 1b. To put… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 14 put up — {v.} 1a. To make and pack (especially a lunch or medicine); get ready; prepare. * /Every morning Mother puts up lunches for the three children./ * /The druggist put up the medicine that the doctor had prescribed./ Compare: MAKE UP(1). 1b. To put… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 15 stable — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun Stable is used after these nouns: ↑racing, ↑riding {{Roman}}II.{{/Roman}} verb Stable is used with these nouns as the object: ↑horse {{Roman}}III.{{/Roman}} adj. 1 not likely to move VERBS ▪ be …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 16 stable — {{11}}stable (adj.) steadfast, firm, mid 13c., from O.Fr. estable, from L. stabilis firm, steadfast, lit. able to stand, from stem of stare to stand (see STET (Cf. stet)). Physical sense of secure against falling is recorded from late 14c. Of… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 17 put\ up — v 1a. To make and pack (especially a lunch or medicine); get ready; prepare. Every morning Mother puts up lunches for the three children. The druggist put up the medicine that the doctor had prescribed. Compare: make up(1) . 1b. To put food into… …

    Словарь американских идиом

  • 18 stable — stable1 stablelike, adj. /stay beuhl/, n., v., stabled, stabling. n. 1. a building for the lodging and feeding of horses, cattle, etc. 2. such a building with stalls. 3. a collection of animals housed in such a building. 4. Horse Racing. a. an… …

    Universalium

  • 19 stable — 1 adjective 1 steady and not likely to move or change: Be careful, that ladder isn t stable. | a stable marriage | a politically stable country 2 calm, reasonable, and not easy to upset: Norman s a bit neurotic, but his wife s a very stable… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 20 stable — 1. noun /ˈsteɪ.bəl/ a) A building, wing or dependency set apart and adapted for lodging and feeding (and training) animals with hoofs, especially horses b) all the racehorses of a particular stable, i.e. belonging to a given owner. 2. verb /ˈsteɪ …

    Wiktionary