Postpone

  • 1 postpone — post·pone vt post·poned, post·pon·ing 1: to put off to a later time 2: to place later in precedence, preference, or importance; specif: to subordinate (a lien) to a later lien post·pon·able adj post·pone·ment n Merriam Webster’s Dictionary …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 postpone — post‧pone [pəæʊstˈpəʊn ǁ poʊsˈpoʊn] verb [transitive] to change the date or time of a planned event to a later one: • The meeting has been postponed until next Tuesday. * * * postpone UK US /pəʊstˈpəʊn/ verb [T] ► to decide that an event should… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 3 Postpone — Post*pone , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Postponed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Postponing}.] [L. postponere, postpositum; post after + ponere to place, put. See {Post }, and {Position}.] 1. To defer to a future or later time; to put off; also, to cause to be… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 postpone — c.1500, from L. postponere put after, neglect, postpone, from post after + ponere put, place (see POSITION (Cf. position)) …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 5 postpone — *defer, suspend, stay, intermit Analogous words: *delay, retard, slow, slacken …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 6 postpone — [v] put off till later time adjourn, cool it*, defer, delay, give a rain check*, hang fire*, hold off, hold over, hold up, lay over, pigeonhole*, prorogue, put back, put on back burner*, put on hold, shelve, suspend, table; concept 130 Ant. carry …

    New thesaurus

  • 7 postpone — ► VERB ▪ arrange for (something) to take place at a time later than that first scheduled. DERIVATIVES postponement noun. ORIGIN Latin postponere, from post after + ponere to place …

    English terms dictionary

  • 8 postpone — [pōst pōn′] vt. postponed, postponing [L postponere < post , POST + ponere, to put: see POSITION] 1. to put off until later; defer; delay 2. to put at or near the end of the sentence [the German verb is postponed] 3. Rare to subordinate …

    English World dictionary

  • 9 postpone — 01. We ve had to [postpone] the picnic because a number of people are busy that day. 02. The search for the plane that crashed in the mountains has been [postponed] due to bad weather. 03. I m afraid that if we decide to [postpone] our wedding,… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 10 postpone — verb sorry, we ll have to postpone the relay race Syn: put off/back, delay, defer, reschedule, adjourn, shelve, put over, take a rain check on; informal put on ice, put on the back burner; rare remit Ant: bring forward •• postpone, adjourn, defer …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 11 postpone — verb ADVERB ▪ indefinitely ▪ The event has been postponed indefinitely due to lack of interest. ▪ merely, only ▪ The inevitable conflict was merely postponed till the next meeting …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 12 postpone — verb (T) to change an event, action etc to a later time or date: The match had to be postponed. | postpone sth until: We re postponing our holiday until we have some more money. | postpone doing sth: Gail and Jim have decided to postpone having a …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 13 postpone */ — UK [pəʊsˈpəʊn] / US [poʊsˈpoʊn] verb [transitive] Word forms postpone : present tense I/you/we/they postpone he/she/it postpones present participle postponing past tense postponed past participle postponed to decide that something will not be… …

    English dictionary

  • 14 postpone — transitive verb (postponed; postponing) Etymology: Latin postponere to place after, postpone, from post + ponere to place more at position Date: circa 1520 1. to put off to a later time ; defer 2. a. to place later (as in a sentence) than the… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 15 postpone — v. 1) (D; tr.) to postpone to, until (the concert has been postponed to Wednesday) 2) (G) they postponed leaving because of the weather * * * [pə(ʊ) spəʊn] until (the concert has been postponed to Wednesday) (D; tr.) to postpone to (G) they… …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 16 postpone — post|pone [pəusˈpəun US pousˈpoun] v [T] [Date: 1400 1500; : Latin; Origin: postponere, from ponere; POSITION1] to change the date or time of a planned event or action to a later one = ↑put back ≠ ↑bring forward ▪ The match had to be postponed… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 17 postpone — [[t]poʊspo͟ʊn[/t]] postpones, postponing, postponed VERB If you postpone an event, you delay it or arrange for it to take place at a later time than was originally planned. [V n/ ing] He decided to postpone the expedition until the following day …

    English dictionary

  • 18 postpone — postponable, adj. postponement, n. postponer, n. /pohst pohn , pohs /, v.t., postponed, postponing. 1. to put off to a later time; defer: He has postponed his departure until tomorrow. 2. to place after in order of importance or estimation;… …

    Universalium

  • 19 postpone — See defer. See defer, delay, postpone …

    Dictionary of problem words and expressions

  • 20 postpone — post|pone [ pous poun ] verb transitive * to decide that something will not be done at the time when it was planned for, but at a later time: Bad weather forced us to postpone Friday s game. Our test has been postponed until next Monday. ╾… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English