Infinitely small

  • 1 Infinitely — In fi*nite*ly, adv. 1. Without bounds or limits; beyond or below assignable limits; as, an infinitely large or infinitely small quantity. [1913 Webster] 2. Very; exceedingly; vastly; highly; extremely. Infinitely pleased. Dryden. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 infinitely — infinite, infinitely are derived from the Latin word infinitus meaning ‘without limit’ (Latin finis ‘end’), and this is the proper meaning of these words in English. In practice, however, they tend to be used in the weaker senses ‘very great’ and …

    Modern English usage

  • 3 Small set (combinatorics) — In combinatorial mathematics, a small set of positive integers:S = {s 0,s 1,s 2,s 3,dots}is one such that the infinite sum:frac{1}{s 0}+frac{1}{s 1}+frac{1}{s 2}+frac{1}{s 3}+cdots converges. A large set is any other set of positive integers (i.e …

    Wikipedia

  • 4 analysis — /euh nal euh sis/, n., pl. analyses / seez /. 1. the separating of any material or abstract entity into its constituent elements (opposed to synthesis). 2. this process as a method of studying the nature of something or of determining its… …

    Universalium

  • 5 Optical aberration — v · d · e Optical aberration …

    Wikipedia

  • 6 Le Sage's theory of gravitation — is the most common name for the kinetic theory of gravity originally proposed by Nicolas Fatio de Duillier in 1690 and later by Georges Louis Le Sage in 1748. The theory proposed a mechanical explanation for Newton s gravitational force in terms… …

    Wikipedia

  • 7 mathematics — /math euh mat iks/, n. 1. (used with a sing. v.) the systematic treatment of magnitude, relationships between figures and forms, and relations between quantities expressed symbolically. 2. (used with a sing. or pl. v.) mathematical procedures,… …

    Universalium

  • 8 Hyperreal number — *R redirects here. For R*, see Rockstar Games. The system of hyperreal numbers represents a rigorous method of treating the infinite and infinitesimal quantities. The hyperreals, or nonstandard reals, *R, are an extension of the real numbers R… …

    Wikipedia

  • 9 Differential of a function — For other uses of differential in mathematics, see differential (mathematics). In calculus, the differential represents the principal part of the change in a function y = ƒ(x) with respect to changes in the independent variable. The… …

    Wikipedia

  • 10 Calculus — This article is about the branch of mathematics. For other uses, see Calculus (disambiguation). Topics in Calculus Fundamental theorem Limits of functions Continuity Mean value theorem Differential calculus  Derivative Change of variables …

    Wikipedia

  • 11 Raëlian cosmology — is a cosmology proposed in 1973 by Raël, the founder of the International Raëlian Movement, a growing religious organization. This cosmology is similar to the Jain cosmology in that it proposes that the observable universe has no creator and is… …

    Wikipedia

  • 12 Infinity — • The infinite, as the word indicates, is that which has no end, no limit, no boundary, and therefore cannot be measured by a finite standard, however often applied; it is that which cannot be attained by successive addition, not exhausted by… …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 13 Riemann hypothesis — The real part (red) and imaginary part (blue) of the Riemann zeta function along the critical line Re(s) = 1/2. The first non trivial zeros can be seen at Im(s) = ±14.135, ±21.022 and ±25.011 …

    Wikipedia

  • 14 Non-standard analysis — Abraham Robinson Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz argued tha …

    Wikipedia

  • 15 Derivative — This article is an overview of the term as used in calculus. For a less technical overview of the subject, see Differential calculus. For other uses, see Derivative (disambiguation) …

    Wikipedia

  • 16 Cardinal point (optics) — For other uses, see Cardinal point (disambiguation). In Gaussian optics, the cardinal points consist of three pairs of points located on the optical axis of an ideal, rotationally symmetric, focal, optical system. For ideal systems, the basic… …

    Wikipedia

  • 17 Actual infinity — is the idea that numbers, or some other type of mathematical object, can form an actual, completed totality; namely, a set. Hence, in the philosophy of mathematics, the abstraction of actual infinity involves the acceptance of infinite entities,… …

    Wikipedia

  • 18 Differential (infinitesimal) — For other uses of differential in calculus, see differential (calculus), and for more general meanings, see differential. In calculus, a differential is traditionally an infinitesimally small change in a variable. For example, if x is a variable …

    Wikipedia

  • 19 Eleaticism — See Eleatic. * * * School of pre Socratic philosophy that flourished in the 5th century BC. It took its name from the Greek colony of Elea (Velia) in southern Italy. It is distinguished by its radical monism i.e., its doctrine of the One,… …

    Universalium

  • 20 Infinitesimal — Infinitesimals (from a 17th century Modern Latin coinage infinitesimus , originally referring to the infinite th member of a series) have been used to express the idea of objects so small that there is no way to see them or to measure them. For… …

    Wikipedia