Inertness

  • 1 Inertness — In*ert ness, n. 1. Lack of activity or exertion; habitual indisposition to action or motion; sluggishness; apathy; insensibility. Glanvill. [1913 Webster] Laziness and inertness of mind. Burke. [1913 Webster] 2. Absence of the power of self… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 inertness — index abeyance, inaction, inertia, insentience, languor, sloth Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 3 inertness — 1660s, from INERT (Cf. inert) + NESS (Cf. ness) …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 4 inertness — inertiškumas statusas T sritis chemija apibrėžtis Medžiagos neveiklumas, nereaktyvumas. atitikmenys: angl. inertness rus. инертность …

    Chemijos terminų aiškinamasis žodynas

  • 5 inertness — inertiškumas statusas T sritis fizika atitikmenys: angl. inertia; inertness vok. Beharrungsvermögen, n; Trägheit, f rus. инертность, f; инерционность, f pranc. inertie, f …

    Fizikos terminų žodynas

  • 6 inertness — inert ► ADJECTIVE 1) lacking the ability or strength to move. 2) chemically inactive. DERIVATIVES inertly adverb inertness noun. ORIGIN Latin iners, unskilled, inactive , from in not + ars skill, art …

    English terms dictionary

  • 7 inertness — noun see inert …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 8 inertness — See inertly. * * * …

    Universalium

  • 9 inertness — noun a) Want of activity or exertion; habitual indisposition to action or motion; sluggishness; apathy; insensibility. b) Absence of the power of self motion; …

    Wiktionary

  • 10 inertness — (Roget s Thesaurus II) noun A lack of action or activity: idleness, inaction, inactivity, inoperativeness, stagnation. See ACTION …

    English dictionary for students

  • 11 inertness — in ert·ness || ɪ nÉœrtnɪs / nɜːr n. motionlessness, inactivity; sluggishness, slowness …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 12 inertness — in·ert·ness …

    English syllables

  • 13 inertness — noun immobility by virtue of being inert • Derivationally related forms: ↑inert • Hypernyms: ↑immobility …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 14 Physical Inertness — (Roget s Thesaurus) < N PARAG:Physical Inertness >N GRP: N 1 Sgm: N 1 inertness inertness dullness &c. >Adj. Sgm: N 1 inertia inertia vis inertioe inertion inactivity torpor languor Sgm: N 1 quiescence quiescence …

    English dictionary for students

  • 15 chemical bonding — ▪ chemistry Introduction       any of the interactions that account for the association of atoms into molecules, ions, crystals, and other stable species that make up the familiar substances of the everyday world. When atoms approach one another …

    Universalium

  • 16 Inert pair effect — The term inert pair effect is often used in relation to the increasing stability of oxidation states that are 2 less than the group valency for the heavier elements of groups 13, 14, 15 and 16. The term inert pair was first proposed by Sidgwick… …

    Wikipedia

  • 17 Diffusion barrier — A diffusion barrier is a thin layer (usually micrometres thick) of metal usually placed between two other metals. It is done to act as a barrier to protect either one of the metals from corrupting the other.[1] Adhesion of a plated metal layer to …

    Wikipedia

  • 18 coordination compound — Chem. complex (def. 10). Also called coordination complex. * * * ▪ chemistry Introduction  any of a class of substances with chemical structures in which a central metal atom is surrounded by nonmetal atoms or groups of atoms, called ligands… …

    Universalium

  • 19 industrial polymers, major — Introduction       chemical compounds used in the manufacture of synthetic industrial materials.       In the commercial production of plastics, elastomers, man made fibres, adhesives, and surface coatings, a tremendous variety of polymers are… …

    Universalium

  • 20 lethargy — lethargy, languor, lassitude, stupor, torpor, torpidity are comparable when meaning physical and mental inertness. Lethargy implies a state marked by an aversion to activity which may be constitutional but is typically induced by disease, extreme …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms