Induce

  • 1 induce — INDÚCE, indúc, vb. III. tranz. 1. A împinge, a îndemna pe cineva să facă un lucru. ♢ expr. A induce în eroare = a înşela, a amăgi. ♦ (log.) A face un raţionament inductiv. 2. A produce un câmp electric prin inducţie electromagnetică. [part.… …

    Dicționar Român

  • 2 induce — in‧duce [ɪnˈdjuːs ǁ ɪnˈduːs] verb [transitive] to make someone decide to do something, perhaps something that seems unwise: induce somebody to do something • Lower interest rates would induce customers to borrow more. * * * induce UK US… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 3 induce — induce, persuade, prevail, get are comparable when meaning to move another by arguments, entreaties, or promises to do or agree to something or to follow a recommended course. Induce usually implies overcoming indifference, hesitation, or… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 4 Induce — In*duce , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Induced}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Inducing}.] [L. inducere, inductum; pref. in in + ducere to lead. See {Duke}, and cf. {Induct}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To lead in; to introduce. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] The poet may be seen… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 induce — I verb actuate, adducere, be responsible, bring about, bring on, bring to pass, call forth, cause, conduce, convince, create, effect, effectuate, exercise influence over, generate, hasten, impellere, incite, inducere, influence, instigate, kindle …

    Law dictionary

  • 6 induce — [in do͞os′, indyo͞os′] vt. induced, inducing [ME enducen < L inducere < in , in + ducere, to lead: see DUCT] 1. to lead on to some action, condition, belief, etc.; prevail on; persuade 2. to bring on; bring about; cause; effect [to induce… …

    English World dictionary

  • 7 induce — (v.) late 14c., to lead by persuasions or other influences, from L. inducere lead into, bring in, introduce, conduct, persuade, from in into, in, on, upon (see IN (Cf. in ) (2)) + ducere to lead (see DUKE (Cf. duke) (n.)). Meaning to bring about …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 8 induce — [v] cause to happen; encourage abet, activate, actuate, argue into, breed, bring about, bring around, bulldoze*, cajole, cause, coax, convince, draw, draw in, effect, engender, generate, get*, get up, give rise to, goose*, impel, incite,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 9 induce — ► VERB 1) succeed in persuading or leading (someone) to do something. 2) bring about or give rise to. 3) produce (an electric charge or current or a magnetic state) by induction. 4) Medicine bring on (childbirth or abortion) artificially.… …

    English terms dictionary

  • 10 induce — 01. Civil servants are being [induced] to take early retirement in order to make cuts to the government s budget. 02. The family physician said he was afraid that surgery could [induce] a heart attack. 03. The baby was over 2 weeks late, and had… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 11 induce — [[t]ɪndju͟ːs, AM du͟ːs [/t]] induces, inducing, induced 1) VERB To induce a state or condition means to cause it. [V n] Doctors said surgery could induce a heart attack. [V ed] ...an economic crisis induced by high oil prices. 2) VERB If you… …

    English dictionary

  • 12 induce — in|duce [ınˈdju:s US ınˈdu:s] v [T] [Date: 1300 1400; : Latin; Origin: inducere, from ducere to lead ] 1.) formal to persuade someone to do something, especially something that does not seem wise induce sb to do sth ▪ Nothing would induce me to… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 13 induce */ — UK [ɪnˈdjuːs] / US [ɪnˈdus] verb [transitive] Word forms induce : present tense I/you/we/they induce he/she/it induces present participle inducing past tense induced past participle induced 1) to cause something, especially a mental or physical… …

    English dictionary

  • 14 induce — in|duce [ ın dus ] verb transitive * to cause something, especially a mental or physical change: Both treatments were effective in inducing remission of the disease. They hoped their work would induce social change. chemically induced mood… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 15 induce — verb (T) 1 to make someone decide to do something, especially something that seems unwise: induce sb to do sth: Nothing would induce me to vote for him again. | What could have induced you to do such a ridiculous thing? 2 to make a woman give… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 16 induce — inducible, adj. /in doohs , dyoohs /, v.t., induced, inducing. 1. to lead or move by persuasion or influence, as to some action or state of mind: to induce a person to buy a raffle ticket. 2. to bring about, produce, or cause: That medicine will… …

    Universalium

  • 17 induce — See impel, induce. See impel, induce …

    Dictionary of problem words and expressions

  • 18 induce — v. (H) we could not induce her to come * * * [ɪn djuːs] (H) we could not induce her to come …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 19 induce — /ɪnˈdjus / (say in dyoohs) verb (t) (induced, inducing) 1. to lead or move by persuasion or influence, as to some action, state of mind, etc.: to induce a person to go. 2. to bring about, produce, or cause: opium induces sleep. 3. Physics to… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 20 induce — To cause or bring about. See induction. * * * in·duce in d(y)üs vt, in·duced; in·duc·ing 1) to cause or bring about <anesthesia induced by drugs>: as a ) (1) to cause the embryological formation of <the optic cup induces lens tissue in… …

    Medical dictionary