📌 Incur 📚 🧬 Academic Dictionaries and Encyclopedias ⚗

Incur

  • 1 incur — in·cur /in kər/ vt in·curred, in·cur·ring: to become liable or subject to: bring down upon oneself incur obligations incur expenses Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 incur — incur, contract, catch are comparable when they mean to bring upon oneself something unpleasant, onerous, or injurious. Incur may or may not imply foreknowledge of what is to happen {incur a debt} {incur criticism} but it usually implies… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 3 incur — in‧cur [ɪnˈkɜː ǁ ˈkɜːr] verb incurred PTandPPX incurring PRESPARTX [transitive] FINANCE if you incur a cost, a debt, or a fine, you do something that means that you lose money or have to pay money: • The foundry has been operating at less than… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 4 Incur — In*cur , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Incurred}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Incurring}.] [L. incurrere to run into or toward; pref. in in + currere to run. See {Current}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To meet or fall in with, as something inconvenient, harmful, or onerous;… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 incur — [in kʉr′] vt. incurred, incurring [ME incurren < L incurrere, to run into or toward, attack < in , in, toward + currere, to run: see CURRENT] 1. to come into or acquire (something undesirable) [to incur a debt] 2. to become subject to… …

    English World dictionary

  • 6 Incur — In*cur , v. i. To pass; to enter. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Light is discerned by itself because by itself it incurs into the eye. South. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 incur — (v.) early 15c., from Anglo Fr. encurir, M.Fr. encourir, from L. incurrere run into or against, rush at, make an attack; figuratively, to befall, happen, occur to, from in upon (see IN (Cf. in ) (2)) + currere to run (see CURRENT (Cf. current)).… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 8 incur — meaning ‘to suffer or experience’, has inflected forms incurred, incurring …

    Modern English usage

  • 9 incur — [v] bring upon oneself acquire, arouse, be subjected to, bring down on*, catch, contract, draw, earn, expose oneself to, gain, get, induce, meet with, obtain, provoke; concept 93 …

    New thesaurus

  • 10 incur — ► VERB (incurred, incurring) ▪ become subject to (something unpleasant) as a result of one s actions. ORIGIN Latin incurrere run into or towards …

    English terms dictionary

  • 11 incur */ — UK [ɪnˈkɜː(r)] / US [ɪnˈkɜr] verb [transitive] Word forms incur : present tense I/you/we/they incur he/she/it incurs present participle incurring past tense incurred past participle incurred 1) to lose money, owe money, or have to pay money as a… …

    English dictionary

  • 12 incur — 01. My boss has furnished me with a generous budget to cover any costs I [incur] while on business out of town. 02. You will be liable for any debts [incurred] if you sign this agreement. 03. You can expect to [incur] a fair amount of debt the… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 13 incur — in|cur [ınˈkə: US ˈkə:r] v past tense and past participle incurred present participle incurring [T] formal [Date: 1400 1500; : Latin; Origin: incurrere to run into , from currere to run ] 1.) if you incur a cost, debt, or a fine, you have to pay… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 14 incur — in|cur [ ın kɜr ] verb transitive * 1. ) to experience something unpleasant as a result of something you have done: Each stage of the process incurs an additional risk. incur someone s wrath/displeasure (=make someone angry): I do not wish to… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 15 incur — verb incurred, incurring (T) 1 to put yourself in an unpleasant situation by your own actions, so that you lose something, get punished etc: incur losses/debts etc: Milton incurred debts of over $300,000. | incur sb s anger/disapproval etc: We… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 16 incur — incurrable, adj. /in kerr /, v.t., incurred, incurring. 1. to come into or acquire (some consequence, usually undesirable or injurious): to incur a huge number of debts. 2. to become liable or subject to through one s own action; bring or take… …

    Universalium

  • 17 incur — transitive verb (incurred; incurring) Etymology: Middle English incurren, from Latin incurrere, literally, to run into, from in + currere to run more at car Date: 15th century to become liable or subject to ; bring down upon oneself < incur… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 18 incur — verb /ɪnˈkəː,ɪnˈkɝ/ a) To bring upon or expose oneself to, especially something inconvenient, harmful, or onerous; to become liable or subject to. [T]he master in his wrath may easily incur worse evil himself than he inflicts [...] b) To render… …

    Wiktionary

  • 19 incur — verb Incur is used with these nouns as the object: ↑casualty, ↑charge, ↑cost, ↑damage, ↑debt, ↑displeasure, ↑enmity, ↑expenditure, ↑expense, ↑fee, ↑injury, ↑ …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 20 incur — [[t]ɪnkɜ͟ː(r)[/t]] incurs, incurring, incurred VERB If you incur something unpleasant, it happens to you because of something you have done. [WRITTEN] [V n] The government had also incurred huge debts... [V n] She falls in love and incurs the… …

    English dictionary