Excess

  • 1 Excess — Ex*cess , n. [OE. exces, excess, ecstasy, L. excessus a going out, loss of self possession, fr. excedere, excessum, to go out, go beyond: cf. F. exc[ e]s. See {Exceed}.] 1. The state of surpassing or going beyond limits; the being of a measure… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 excess — ex·cess adj: more than a usual or specified amount; specif: additional to an amount specified under another insurance policy excess coverage excess insurance Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …

    Law dictionary

  • 3 excess — n Excess, superfluity, surplus, surplusage, overplus denote something which goes beyond a limit or bound. Excess applies to whatever exceeds a limit, measure, bound, or accustomed degree {in measure rein thy joy; scant this excess Shak.} {the… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 4 Excess-3 — binary coded decimal (XS 3), also called biased representation or Excess N, is a numeral system used on some older computers that uses a pre specified number N as a biasing value. It is a way to represent values with a balanced number of positive …

    Wikipedia

  • 5 excess — [ek ses′, ikses′; ] also, esp.for adj. [, ek′ses΄] n. [ME & OFr exces < L excessus < pp. of excedere: see EXCEED] 1. action or conduct that goes beyond the usual, reasonable, or lawful limit 2. lack of moderation; intemperance;… …

    English World dictionary

  • 6 Excess — is a state of something being present beyond a requisite amount. In certain contexts, it has a more specialized meaning:* In insurance, similar to deductible. * In chemistry, describing any reagent that is not the limiting reagent. * Excess is… …

    Wikipedia

  • 7 excess — (n.) late 14c., from O.Fr. exces (14c.) excess, extravagance, outrage, from L. excessus departure, a going beyond the bounds of reason or beyond the subject, from stem of excedere to depart, go beyond (see EXCEED (Cf. exceed)). As an adjective… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 8 excess — [n1] overabundance of something balance, by product, enough, exorbitance, exuberance, fat, fulsomeness, glut, inundation, lavishness, leavings, leftover, luxuriance, nimiety, overdose, overflow, overkill, overload, overmuch, overrun, oversupply,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 9 excess — ► NOUN 1) an amount that is more than necessary, permitted, or desirable. 2) lack of moderation, especially in eating or drinking. 3) (excesses) outrageous or immoderate behaviour. 4) Brit. a part of an insurance claim to be paid by the insured.… …

    English terms dictionary

  • 10 excess — in an insurance policy, excess clauses specify that the policyholder will be responsible for a portion of claims under certain conditions. Glossary of Business Terms The dollar amount by which the equity exceeds the margin requirements in a… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 11 excess — ♦♦♦ excesses (The noun is pronounced [[t]ɪkse̱s[/t]]. The adjective is pronounced [[t]e̱kses[/t]].) 1) N VAR: with supp, usu a N of n An excess of something is a larger amount than is needed, allowed, or usual. An excess of houseplants in a small …

    English dictionary

  • 12 excess —    by Ashley Woodward   Baudrillard s treatment of the theme of excess varies over the course of his writings, and it appears as both a positively and a negatively valued idea. Baudrillard s early understanding of excess is significantly indebted …

    The Baudrillard dictionary

  • 13 excess — 01. Vitamins are important for our health, but an [excess] can cause serious health problems. 02. He has starting jogging in an effort to get rid of a little [excess] weight. 03. After cooking the chicken, pour off any [excess] liquid in the pan …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 14 excess — ex|cess1 [ ık ses, ek,ses ] noun ** 1. ) singular or uncount a larger amount of something than is usual or necessary: Cover both sides of the meat with flour, shaking off any excess. excess of: an excess of oxygen in his bloodstream 2. ) excesses …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 15 excess — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun 1 too much of sth ADJECTIVE ▪ rhetorical, stylistic, verbal ▪ His statements cannot be simply dismissed as rhetorical excess. ▪ financial ▪ scan …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 16 excess — I UK [ɪkˈses] / US / US [ˈekˌses] noun Word forms excess : singular excess plural excesses ** 1) [singular/uncountable] a larger amount of something than is usual or necessary Cover both sides of the meat with flour, shaking off any excess.… …

    English dictionary

  • 17 excess — ex|cess1 [ıkˈses, ˈekses] n [Date: 1300 1400; : French; Origin: excès, from Late Latin excessus, from Latin excedere; EXCEED] 1.) [singular, U] a larger amount of something than is allowed or needed ▪ After you apply the oil, wait 20 minutes… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 18 excess — 1 noun 1 (singular, uncountable) a larger amount of something than is allowed or needed: Scrape any excess off with a spatula. | an excess of: It was an excess of enthusiasm that caused the problem. 2 in excess of more than a particular amount:… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 19 excess — n. /ik ses , ek ses/; adj., v. /ek ses, ik ses /, n. 1. the fact of exceeding something else in amount or degree: His strength is in excess of yours. 2. the amount or degree by which one thing exceeds another: The bill showed an excess of several …

    Universalium

  • 20 excess — n. 1) in excess of 2) to excess (to drink to excess) * * * [ ekses] in excess of to excess (to drink to excess) …

    Combinatory dictionary