Entire

  • 1 Entire — En*tire , a. [F. entier, L. integer untouched, undiminished, entire; pref. in , negative + the root of tangere to touch. See {Tangent}, and cf. {Integer}.] 1. Complete in all parts; undivided; undiminished; whole; full and perfect; not deficient; …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 ENTIRE — Function Server Architecture (Originalbild aus dem White Paper 1990) ENTIRE ist ein Produkt der Software AG. Entire Function Server Architecture (EFS) ermöglicht es, Anwendungssysteme aus Komponenten aufzubauen, welche als Services verteilt in… …

    Deutsch Wikipedia

  • 3 Entire — En*tire , n. 1. Entirely. Too long to print in entire. Thackeray. [1913 Webster] 2. (Brewing) A name originally given to a kind of beer combining qualities of different kinds of beer. [Eng.] Foker s Entire. Thackeray. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 entire — en·tire adj: not capable of being divided into independent parts (as promises): constituting an undivided unit an entire contract compare divisible, severable Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …

    Law dictionary

  • 5 entire — [en tīr′, intīr′] adj. [ME enter < OFr entier < L integer, whole, untouched, undiminished: see INTEGER] 1. a) not lacking any of the parts; whole b) complete; thorough; absolute [entire confidence] 2. unbroken; intact 3 …

    English World dictionary

  • 6 entire — late 14c., from O.Fr. entier whole, unbroken, intact, complete, from L. integrum (nom. integer; see INTEGER (Cf. integer)) …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 7 entire — 1 *whole, total, all, gross Analogous words: complete, *full, plenary Antonyms: partial 2 *perfect, whole, intact Analogous words: integrated, concatenated (see under INTEGRATE vb): unified, consolidated, compacted (see COMPACT vb) Antonyms:… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 8 entire — [adj] complete, whole absolute, all, choate, consolidated, continuous, full, gross, intact, integral, integrated, outright, perfect, plenary, sound, thorough, total, unbroken, undamaged, undiminished, undivided, unified, unimpaired, uninjured,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 9 entire — ► ADJECTIVE 1) with no part left out; whole. 2) not broken, damaged, or decayed. 3) without qualification; absolute. ORIGIN Old French entier, from Latin integer untouched, whole …

    English terms dictionary

  • 10 entire — 01. He threw up after drinking an [entire] case of beer. 02. He was so tired that he slept through the [entire] movie. 03. The decision is [entirely] up to you. 04. It seemed like the [entire] world was watching the television on the day Neil… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 11 entire — I. adjective Etymology: Middle English enter, entier, entire, from Anglo French enter, entier, from Latin integer, literally, untouched, from in + tangere to touch more at tangent Date: 14th century 1. having no element or part left out ; whole < …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 12 entire — entireness, n. /en tuyeur /, adj. 1. having all the parts or elements; whole; complete: He wrote the entire novel in only six weeks. 2. full or thorough: He has been given entire freedom of choice in this matter. 3. not broken, mutilated, or… …

    Universalium

  • 13 entire — [[t]ɪnta͟ɪ͟ə(r)[/t]] ♦♦ ADJ: det ADJ (emphasis) You use entire when you want to emphasize that you are referring to the whole of something, for example, the whole of a place, time, or population. He had spent his entire life in China as a doctor …

    English dictionary

  • 14 entire — [14] Entire and integrity [15] have the same source – Latin integer. This meant ‘whole, complete’, and was formed from the prefix in ‘in’ and *tag , the base which produced Latin tangere ‘touch’, source of English tactile and tangible (and indeed …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 15 entire — [14] Entire and integrity [15] have the same source – Latin integer. This meant ‘whole, complete’, and was formed from the prefix in ‘in’ and *tag , the base which produced Latin tangere ‘touch’, source of English tactile and tangible (and indeed …

    Word origins

  • 16 Entire — *In philately, see Cover. *In mathematics, see Entire function. *In animal fancy and animal husbandry, entire indicates that an animal has not been desexed, that is, spayed (female) or neutered (male). *In botany, an entire leaf is a single whole …

    Wikipedia

  • 17 entire — en|tire W2S3 [ınˈtaıə US ˈtaır] adj [only before noun] [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: entier, from Latin integer; INTEGER] used when you want to emphasize that you mean all of a group, period of time, amount etc = ↑whole ▪ It was the… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 18 entire — en|tire [ ın taır ] adjective only before noun *** used for emphasizing that you mean all or every part of something: the entire adult population He gave his entire attention to the task in hand. The railroad enables distribution across the… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 19 entire — adjective (only before noun) the entire group, amount, period of time etc is used when you want to emphasize what you are saying: the entire staff | We spent the entire afternoon gossiping …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 20 entire — adjective 1) I devoted my entire life to him Syn: whole, complete, total, full; undivided Ant: partial 2) only one of the vases is entire Syn: intact, unbroken …

    Thesaurus of popular words