Detach

  • 1 Detach — De*tach , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Detached}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Detaching}.] [F. d[ e]tacher (cf. It. distaccare, staccare); pref. d[ e] (L. dis) + the root found also in E. attach. See {Attach}, and cf. {Staccato}.] 1. To part; to separate or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 detach — detach, disengage, abstract mean to remove one thing from another with which it is in union or association. One detaches something when one breaks a literal or figurative connection, tie, or bond and thereby isolates it or makes it independent… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 3 detach — UK US /dɪˈtætʃ/ verb [T] ► to separate or remove something from something else that it is joined to: detach sth from sth »Detach the reply slip from this letter and return it to the above address. → Compare ATTACH(Cf. ↑attach) …

    Financial and business terms

  • 4 detach — 1680s, from Fr. détacher to detach, untie, from O.Fr. destachier, from des apart + attachier attach (see ATTACH (Cf. attach)). Related: Detached; detaching …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 5 detach — ► VERB 1) disengage (something) and remove it. 2) (detach oneself from) leave or distance oneself from (a group or situation). 3) (be detached) Military be sent on a separate mission. DERIVATIVES detachability noun …

    English terms dictionary

  • 6 Detach — De*tach , v. i. To push asunder; to come off or separate from anything; to disengage. [1913 Webster] [A vapor] detaching, fold by fold, From those still heights. Tennyson. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 detach — I verb break off, cleave, disconnect, disengage, disentangle, disiungere, disjoin, dispart, dissever, dissociate, disunite, divide, divorce, part, remove, seiungere, separare, separate, sever, split, uncouple, unfasten, unlink, unplug, unstick… …

    Law dictionary

  • 8 detach — [v] disconnect, cut off abstract, disaffiliate, disassemble, disassociate, disengage, disentangle, disjoin, dismount, dissociate, disunite, divide, divorce, free, isolate, loose, loosen, part, remove, segregate, separate, sever, sunder, take… …

    New thesaurus

  • 9 detach — [dē tach′, ditach′] vt. [Fr détacher < OFr detachier, destachier < de , DE + estachier, to ATTACH] 1. to unfasten or separate and remove; disconnect; disengage 2. to send (troops, ships, etc.) on a special mission detachability n.… …

    English World dictionary

  • 10 detach — [[t]dɪtæ̱tʃ[/t]] detaches, detaching, detached 1) V ERG If you detach one thing from another that it is fixed to, you remove it. If one thing detaches from another, it becomes separated from it. [FORMAL] [V n] Detach the white part of the… …

    English dictionary

  • 11 detach — 01. The arms of this toy robot can be [detached], and replaced with wings or various tools. 02. Roman statues were made with [detachable] heads so that one head could be removed and replaced by another. 03. [Detach] the pink copy of the form, and …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 12 detach — de|tach [dıˈtætʃ] v [Date: 1600 1700; : French; Origin: détacher, from Old French destachier, from atachier to attach ] 1.) [I and T] if you detach something, or if it detaches, it becomes separated from the thing it was attached to ≠ ↑attach… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 13 detach */ — UK [dɪˈtætʃ] / US verb Word forms detach : present tense I/you/we/they detach he/she/it detaches present participle detaching past tense detached past participle detached 1) a) [transitive] to remove a part from something A leaf detached itself… …

    English dictionary

  • 14 detach — verb (T) 1 to remove a piece or part of something that is designed to be removed: If you are interested in the course, detach and fill out the application form. | detach sth from: You can detach the hood from the jacket. 2 detach yourself to try… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 15 detach — de|tach [ dı tætʃ ] verb * 1. ) transitive to remove a part from something: SEPARATE: A leaf detached itself and fell to the ground. detach something from something: Two soldiers were struggling to detach the machine gun from its mount. a )… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 16 detach — v. (D; tr.) to detach from (the officer was detached temporarily from his unit) * * * [dɪ tætʃ] (D; tr.) to detach from (the officer was detached temporarily from his unit) …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 17 detach — Synonyms and related words: abstract, accredit, assign, authorize, break up, call up, cast off, charge, charter, commandeer, commission, commit, conscript, consign, cut off, deactivate, debrief, delegate, demob, demobilize, depute, deputize,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 18 detach — verb 1》 disengage (something) and remove it. 2》 (detach oneself from) leave or separate oneself from (a group or place).     ↘(be detached) Military be sent on a separate mission. Derivatives detachability noun detachable adjective Origin C16 (in …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 19 detach — verb he detached the lamp from its bracket detach oneself from Syn: unfasten, disconnect, disengage, separate, uncouple, remove, loose, unhitch, unhook, free, pull off, cut off, break off Ant: attac …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 20 detach — [dɪˈtætʃ] verb [I/T] to remove a part from something, or to become removed from something Syn: separate • detach yourself (from) to stop being involved in something in an emotional way[/ex] …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English