Constrain

  • 1 Constrain — Con*strain , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Constrained}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Constraining}.] [OF. constraindre, F. contrainde, L. constringere; con + stringere to draw tight. See {Strain}, and. cf. {Constrict}, {Constringe}.] 1. To secure by bonds; to chain; …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 constrain — I (compel) verb actuate, apply pressure, assert oneself, bring about by force, bring pressure to bear upon, burden, cause to, charge, coerce, cogere, command, command influence, compel, compellere, decree, demand, dominate, drive, enforce,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 3 constrain — early 14c., constreyen, from stem of O.Fr. constreindre (Mod.Fr. contraindre) restrain, control, from L. constringere to bind together, tie tightly, fetter, shackle, chain, from com together (see COM (Cf. com )) + stringere to draw tight (see… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 4 constrain — oblige, coerce, compel, *force Analogous words: impel, drive, *move, actuate: require, exact, *demand …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 5 constrain — [v] force; restrain ban, bar, bind, bottle up, bridle, chain, check, coerce, compel, concuss, confine, constrict, cool off*, cork, curb, deny, deprive, disallow, drive, hem in*, hog tie*, hold back, hold down, hold in, immure, impel, imprison,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 6 constrain — ► VERB 1) compel or force towards a course of action. 2) (constrained) appearing forced. 3) severely restrict the scope, extent, or activity of. DERIVATIVES constrainedly adverb. ORIGIN Old French constraindre, from Latin constringere bind t …

    English terms dictionary

  • 7 constrain — [kən strān′] vt. [ME constreinen < OFr constreindre < L constringere, to bind together, draw together < com , together + stringere, to draw tight: see STRICT] 1. to force into, or hold in, close bounds; confine 2. to hold back by force;… …

    English World dictionary

  • 8 constrain — v. (formal) 1) (D; tr.) to constrain from 2) (H) to constrain smb. to do smt. * * * [kən streɪn] (H) to constrain smb. to do smt. (formal) (D; tr.) to constrain from …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 9 constrain — con|strain [kənˈstreın] v [T] [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: constraindre, from Latin constringere to constrict, constrain , from com ( COM ) + stringere to pull tight ] 1.) to stop someone from doing what they want to do constrain sb… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 10 constrain */ — UK [kənˈstreɪn] / US verb [transitive] Word forms constrain : present tense I/you/we/they constrain he/she/it constrains present participle constraining past tense constrained past participle constrained formal 1) to limit someone s freedom to do …

    English dictionary

  • 11 constrain — See check, curb, restrain, constrain. See check, curb, restrain, constrain …

    Dictionary of problem words and expressions

  • 12 constrain — 01. Too many women s lives have been [constrained] by the sexist views held by some people in society. 02. The boss has turned down our request to expand the Research and Development Department due to financial [constraints]. 03. We had to… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 13 constrain — [[t]kənstre͟ɪn[/t]] constrains, constraining, constrained 1) VERB To constrain someone or something means to limit their development or force them to behave in a particular way. [FORMAL] [be V ed] Women are too often constrained by family… …

    English dictionary

  • 14 constrain — transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French constraindre, from Latin constringere to constrict, constrain, from com + stringere to draw tight more at strain Date: 14th century 1. a. to force by imposed stricture, restriction, or… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 15 constrain — verb Constrain is used with these nouns as the subject: ↑factor …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 16 constrain — con|strain [ kən streın ] verb transitive FORMAL 1. ) to limit someone s freedom to do what they want: RESTRICT: We are always constrained by our budget. planning regulations that constrain development 2. ) usually passive to force someone to do… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 17 constrain — verb (T) 1 to stop someone from doing what they want to do: constrain by: Many women feel constrained by their roles as wife and mother. 2 to prevent something from developing and improving: Our research has been constrained by lack of funding …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 18 constrain — /kənˈstreɪn / (say kuhn strayn) verb (t) 1. to force, compel, or oblige; bring about by compulsion: to constrain obedience. 2. to confine forcibly, as by bonds. 3. to repress or restrain. {Middle English constreign(en), from Old French… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 19 constrain — constrainable, adj. constrainer, n. constrainingly, adv. /keuhn strayn /, v.t. 1. to force, compel, or oblige: He was constrained to admit the offense. 2. to confine forcibly, as by bonds. 3. to repress or restrain: Cold weather constrained the… …

    Universalium

  • 20 constrain — verb a) to force physically, by strong persuasion or pressurizing; to compel; to oblige b) to keep within close bounds; to confine See Also: restra …

    Wiktionary